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Also known as the Prairie Cathedral.

Location:
68003 Cooks Creek Road
Cooks Creek, Manitoba
Corner of PTH 212 (Cooks Creek Road) and Zora Road

Mailing Address:
Box 35, Group 23, RR 2
Dugald, Manitoba R0E 0K0

Contact:
Phone: 204-444-2478
Email: info@immaculate.ca

Website:
immaculate.ca

Sunday Divine Liturgy
10:30 am

Pastor
Fr. Taras Kowch

History

The Immaculate Conception Church of the Virgin Mary, is the third church of the parish.

The first church, built in 1904 and named St. John the Baptist, was built in the shape of a cross with one central dome. For the convenience of the parishioners another church, St. Nicholas, was built half a mile north and one and one half miles east of the first church. The Basilian fathers from Winnipeg served the parish, rotating the services weekly between the two churches. The first parish priest assigned to the parish was Rev. Roman Krupa, followed by Rev. Peter Oleskiw who purchased the twenty acres of land on which stands the present Immaculate Conception Church. Other clergy who served in this parish were: Rev. Father Roman Cherepaniak, Rev. John Coulson, Rev. Damaskyn, Rev. Pilipovich, CSSR, Rev. Emil Krasisky, Rev. Drohomyresky and from 1930 Rev. Philip Ruh, O.M.I., who drew the plans and headed the construction of the present Immaculate Conception Church, which, because of its majestic appearance, is referred to as the “Prairie Cathedral.”

The church is of a cruciform construction on a solid basement foundation in which there is a chapel where services are held during the winter. The altar in this chapel has an antimension signed by Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky. Besides the chapel there are two other large rooms and a kitchen. There are six entrances into the basement and 65 windows. Measurements of the basement alone, which are: length – 150 feet, width – 101 feet, and height – 12 feet, illustrate the vastness of the structure. For example, one thousand yards of gravel, five freight-car-loads of cement and tens of tons of steel were used for the structure. The arched roof of the church rests on six large and two smaller interior columns of steel and cement. The walls, 40 feet in height and of brick, contain two rows of windows totaling 95 in all. For practical reasons, some of these windows are covered from the interior. A central open dome reaches an exterior height of 110 feet. There are four smal1er dome beside the large dome and four mall domes that occupy the four corners of the gable-end roof; one ·each above the choir loft, sanctuary, and opposite ends of the nave. All the domes are topped with highly decorated wrought-iron crosses. A span of steps with band railing occupy the front approach of the church. An anti-roof above the entrances rests on a set of ten iron reinforced cement columns. The central doors lead into the narthex in which are found steps leading to the choir loft. Doors on either side of the main entrance lead to basement and into the nave of the church. The church has three longitudinal and two transversal (side) sections. A large open dome centres the four arches, three of which lead toward a curved ceiling, and the fourth which becomes concave above the semi-circular apse. This is all supported by massive pilasters and columns of iron reinforced cement, which branch out into an arcade of small pilasters and arches. This architecture allows for the placement of a number of side altars. One in the niche just to the left of the sanctuary is dedicated to Our Lady of Perpetual Help, and one is just to the right to Our Lord Jesus Christ. On other side altars are found a processional icon and a statue of the Mother of God. It should be mentioned here that this icon of Our Lady of Perpetual Help was placed in contact w1th the original icon of Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Rome in 1980 and has been placed in this church for public adoration by Metropolitan Maxim Hermaniuk on Aug. 16, 1981.

A picture of St. Nicholas is placed high on the end wall of the transversal section of the nave, under which are a row of confessionals. To the right and the left of the raised sanctuary are exits to sacristies. In the end apsidal wall is an exit leading to a corridor which also leads to the sacristies and to a set of stairs to the basement. The walls of the church are finished in a latex paint. On some of these walls are paintings, with several paintings on the apsidal wall. The central one is a painting of the Assumption of the Mother of God. Above it is a picture of the Mother of God Being Taken into Heaven. To the right is the Crowning of the Mother of God. To the right of that is the Appearance of the blessed Virgin Mary to the Children in Fatima. To the left of the central painting is the painting of the Patronage of the Blessed Virgin Mary. There are other paintings which take up the whole wall. Of the smaller paintings those of the Evangelists, in the pendentives, are most significant. From the centre of the highly decorated dome is suspended an electrical chandelier. The cornice around the church and the individually framed panels and arcades, are painted to give them a marble effect.

There are 43 pews, which seat 6-7 persons, and 26 pews, which seat 2-3 persons, and a row of chairs, that provide seating for 500 to 600 persons. The church is heated by two oil furnaces (one larger, one smaller).

Near the church stands a large two tiered bell tower housing three bells. The bell tower, built of iron reinforced cement is topped with a high cupola and a cross. On the ramparts on the side of the top level of the steps at the entrance to the church, are four statues of angels.

To the left of the church, covered in various shrubs and bushes is the entrance to the grotto of Our Lady of Lourdes. The Grotto was built to provide an illusion of an underground structure. The columns and walls are constructed of iron reinforced cement and the floor is asphalt. Within the grotto are statues depicting the XIV Stations of the Cross. You rise to the Cross and you also descend to the grave, to the crucified Christ. Prayers of hundreds of pilgrims who make a yearly journey to this pilgrimage place from distant parts of Canada, and some from beyond Canada, give thanks to Our Lord for His blessings in the presence of the icon of Our Lady of Perpetual Help, which is brought to the grotto from the Immaculate Conception Church during the Pilgrimage celebrations. Almost all the clergy, with their parishioners of the Archeparchy, visit this place of worship. Among those who came here with Bishop Vasilij Ladyka, who was last here in 1940, was Auxiliary Bishop Andrew Roborecki. Others who visit are; Bishop Myron Daciuk and, almost every year since he was a bishop and then later as the metropolitan, Metropolitan Maxim Hermaniuk.

Four cemeteries in the area belong to the parish of Cooks Creek. Rev. Philip Ruh is buried in the cemetery next to the church.

Ukrainian settlement started in the Cooks Creek area in 1897. In 1904 the parish united and, with Fred Spiwak, built their first church. Participants in the building of the first church were: Michael Uskowsky, Fred Kozie, Simon Nymchuk, John Trush and ? Prokopenko. Rev. P. Ruh died in 1962. With the help of Michael Yanchynsky, Victor Garbert, and much volunteer work by the parishioners, Rev. P. Ruh built the present church and lived in the parsonage which was built in 1930 and now sold. After his death the Redemptorist Fathers administered the parish, with Rev. Michael Baranecky and Rev. Gregory Novak. Other priests who served in the parish were: Rev. Marteniuk, Rev. Volodymyr Bozyk (1967-72), Rev. Anthony Pawliuk (1972-74, Rev. Michael Kolynich (1974-77), Rev. Michael Buyachok (1977-78), Rev. John Sholdak (1978-88). Other clergy who assisted in the parish were Rev. Joseph Sliuha from 1940 to 1941 and Rev. Mathew Kotowich from 1954 to 1962. The parish is proud of the following vocations: Rev. Juvenalis Slota OSBM, Sister Servants Alfonsia Antonia Vus and Stella Watchko. On May 3, 1987, Morris Marian Kowalchuk was ordained a deacon. When the parish was founded there were 30 members, in 1941 there were 250 members and many school aged children. At this time there are 250 members, of which 100 were born in Ukraine.

In 1961 Rev. P. Ruh appointed a committee of Steve Rosce, Bill Panchyshyn and Morris M. Kowalchuk to carry on the administrative work of the parish. A year later Fred Dudych was elected to the committee. In 1988 the parish committee consisted of: Eugene Harasymec, John Palidwor, Donald Skibo, Garry Kosheliuk, Gordon Onsowich, Bill Fecio and Morris M. Kowalchuk. Rev. John Sholdak was the parish priest in 1988.

In 1960 a male voice choir under the leadership of Bill Panchyshyn was formed. In 1988 there was a mixed choir under the leadership of Marian Chabluk. Cantoral duties have been fulfilled for many years by Ivan Polidvar.

The Ukrainian Catholic parish in Cooks Creek with the church of the Immaculate Conception of the Mother of God, the “Prairie Cathedral” and its Grotto, are a pilgrimage centre and serves Ukrainians in the communities of Dugald, Oakbank, Hazelridge and Pine Ridge.

Source: Kowcz-Baran, Anna Maria. Ukrainian Catholic Churches of Winnipeg Archeparchy. Book One of Volume IV – History of the Ukrainian Catholic Churches in Canada. Winnipeg, 1991.

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The Ukrainian Pioneers who emigrated from Halychyna (Galacia) in Western Ukraine, and settled in the village of Brooklands (incorporated in 1921), needed their own church. Here, they could worship and preserve their faith, language, traditions and culture. They decided to build their own church, in the most  challenging of times, during the Great Depression of the 1930’s. Money was scarce for everyone. With hope in their hearts and prayers on their lips, they set out on the greatest of journeys, paved with pennies, nickels and dimes to erect the symbol of their faith. [from their website]

Location:
40 Ada Street
Winnipeg, Manitoba R2R 0L5

Contact:
Phone: 204-633-5990
Email: holyghostucc@gmail.com

Website:
hguccbrooklands.weebly.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy
9:00am (September to June)
10:00am (July & August)
English & Ukrainian

Pastor
Fr. Bohdan Borowec

Pastoral Assistant
Deacon Victor Humniski

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Location:
5 Church Street
Red Lake, Ontario

Contact:
Phone: 807-727-2598
Pastor’s Phone: 807-727-2122

Sunday Divine Liturgy
-unknown-

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Location:
430 4th Street North
Kenora, Ontario, P9N 2M9

Contact:
Phone: 807-468-7490

Sunday Divine Liturgy
-unknown-

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The Byzantine Catholic Community of St.Mary’s is rooted in the rich Tradition and Spiritual heritage of the Kievan Church of Ukraine. Acknowledging and bearing witness to the Truth that with God’s grace and in the power of the Holy Spirit we reveal Christ’s way of sanctification and eternal salvation to all.
We reach out to all those who are seeking God’s love and a supporting Christian Community that believes each person is created in the image and likeliness of God our Divine Creator. At St.Mary’s church all people are welcome and each person is equally valuable, both in the eyes of God and in our Parish Community.
We live as an active believing Christian community. Affirming one another and living the Greatest Commandments of the Law of the Gospel given by Jesus Christ known as the two Commandments of Love. Matthew 22: 37-40 “You shall love the Lord, your God, with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind. This is the greatest and the first commandment. The second is like it: You shall love your neighbor as yourself. The whole law and the prophets depend on these two commandments.”
We embrace God’s Will and God’s Love in our lives and in our community in order that we may live in peace and prosperity.

Location:
40 Notre Dame Avenue
Sudbury, Ontario, P3C 5K2

Contact:
Phone: 705-675-8244
Fax: 705-675-1581
Email: stmaryssudbury@yahoo.ca

Website:
saintmarysudbury.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy
9:00 am – Ukrainian
10:30 am – English

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At the turn of the 20th Century, migrating Ukrainians were attracted to job opportunities at the Steel Mill in Sault Ste. Marie. By 1916, a Ukrainian Community had been established in the Bayview area – walking distance from the Steel Mill. This hard working and faithful group initiated the construction of a Church even though they were without a regular priest. Others from the Polish, Croatian, Italian, French and English communities joined to help. The Church at 118 Pittsburgh Street was completed in 1917 and was shared with the Roman Catholic Community for 24 years until the first permanent priest, Father Chorny, arrived in 1942.
In the early 1950’s, another major wave of Ukrainian immigrants started to arrive and the local Catholic parish began to flourish. The parish grew to approximately 90 families and was always one of the busiest places in Sault Ste. Marie. The local parish community hosted many suppers and dances, picnics and other events to raise funds for the needs of the Church. Sunday afternoon as well as concerts for such occasions as Taras Shevchenko Day. Children attended Ukrainian language school, learned the art of Ukrainian dance, and studied their religion very hard under the supervision of the Ukrainian sisters of Christian Charity who came to the Sault every summer.
The women of the parish joined the Ukrainian Catholic Women’s League of Canada in 1956. The women have been the backbone of St. Mary’s ever since its founding and continue to be the major support of the parish to this very day. Without the love of their Church and their self-sacrifice, St. Mary’s would never have been able to celebrate its Diamond Jubilee in 1992. Indeed our heartfelt gratitude goes out to each and every one.
In 1958 the parish had grown to such an extent that it was necessary to make some major renovations in the Church and hall. The Church was expanded, adding a choir loft, vestibule, a small basement and washrooms. As well the interior of the Church was refinished. The original Church did not have any domes; these were added at the same time.
The hall was raised and a full basement put under it , and washrooms were added. The original parish house was demolished and a new home was built next to the Church. All this work was done under the pastorate of Fr. Julian Habrusewych.
With all these improvements there continued to be many problems with the buildings over the years since flooding was an annual event in the Steel Plant Subdivision. Every spring the banks of the Bonney Creek would overflow to the point where many people had to take a boat to work. St. Mary’s was no exception. More than once it was so badly flooded that the only way into the Church for Easter Services was to balance yourself on benches placed in single file lined up to the back door to the Church.
After Father Habrusevych, Fr. Nicholas Siry arrived as Pastor of St. Mary’s. Because most of the young people at that time had to travel such a far distance to University, it made it very difficult, if not impossible, for them to be home to celebrate Christmas and Easter with their families. It was decided that a vote should take place as to which calendar the parish should follow. In 1968 it was decided that the Gregorian Calendar would be followed by the local Ukrainian Catholic Parish in order to better serve the needs of its faithful. This calendar has been in use ever since. In all, the parish was served by the following pastors from 1918 to 2006; 1942-1944 Fr. Nicholas Chorney; 1944-1948; Fr. Wasyl Humeniuk; 1948, Fr. Charney; 1948-1949 Fr. Wasyl Zwarych; 1949-1951 Fr. P. Belecky; 1959-1974 Fr. Nicholas Siry; 1974-1976 Fr. William Kondusky; 1976-1983 Fr. Theodore Palczynski; 1983-1985 Fr. Stephen Muth; 1985-1998 Fr. Anton Szymychalski; 1998 – to the present Fr. Jaroslaw Lazoryk.
In 1985, Fr. Anton Szymychalski was assigned to St. Mary’s with the request of Bishop Isidore Borecky to expand the parish. Under his leadership, plans for a new church were unveiled since the original church could no longer serve the Faithful. The majority of parishioners had moved away from the original subdivision “BayView” and the Church was in desperate need of repairs. Construction started in September of 1987. In April of 1989 the first Divine Liturgy was held in the basement. Then, on September 3, 1989 the New Church was Consecrated by Bishop Isidore Borecky. Finally, after 72 years, the Dream of the Founder of St. Mary’s was accomplished. A beautiful new temple was erected. Currently our parish has 95 registered families.
At a time when many churches face declining attendance, St. Mary’s has the added challenges of next to zero influx of Ukrainians to our community and at the same time an emigration of our educated and talented youth to larger urban centres in search of employment opportunities. Our church community, however, remains optimistic and proactive in its commitment to growth.
Centrally located, high on the top of a hill, St. Mary’s together with ‘its adjacent neighbours ( St. Basil’s Catholic High School and North America’s Tallest freestanding lighted cross) is a beacon of hope to the city below that God’s love is everpresent in our community. A community in which the profile of St. Mary’s has risen exponentially and instilled a pride and new confidence in our Parish. Visitors constantly compliment the design and beauty of our Church.
Our mission is to reach out to the community (Ukrainians and Non-Ukrainians) by offering a warm, welcoming atmosphere where the Faithful may worship and peacefully connect to God. The English Masses allow other cultures to experience and share in our rich traditional rites and customs. The Welcome Message on our weekly Bulletin is’ a Testament to Our Mission: “Welcome to Our Parish … Enter Expectantly … Breathe Prayerfully …. Worship Reverently … Relax Restfully …. Greet Others in Love …. Leave Touched By God, and Come Again Soon.”
Our reaching out is showing results. The percentage of other cultures attending our services is on the rise. Our hard working Multi-Cultural Kitchen Volunteers are known for their Perogies and Cabbage Rolls throughout the community. Their efforts have significantly reduced the Church Mortgage. In a similar vein, the very active Men’s Club Sponsors various Fund Raising Events. Their Monthly Brunches are often “Sold Out” and the Lobsterfest is a Social must in our Community. Their next project is the installation of a much needed elevator to accommodate those with disabilities.
We are also very proud of our close relationship with our Sister Satellite Parish-St. Gregory’s Mission in Wawa. Although separated by 250 KM of desolated and treacherous highway, our Pastor, Fr. Jaroslaw Lazoryk, makes time to visit once a Month.
We are also very appreciative and Thankful to the Priests from our Eparchy who volunteer to visit and assist our Parish when Fr. Jerry has other commitments. This is special to us who by distance are remoted, because it reminds us that we are a part of a Greater and Supportive Community. In turn, we assure you that we are committed to being here as a viable and dependable “Northern Star” for our Vast (Geographic) Eparchy.

Location:
293 St. George’s Avenue West
Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, P6B 6E8

Contact:
Phone: 705-942-1377
Fax: 705-942-1377
Pastor’s Phone: 705-256-1025
Email: soostmaryukr@bellnet.ca

Website:
stmarysukrssm.ca

Sunday Divine Liturgy:
9:30 am – Ukrainian
11:00 am – English

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Location:
629 McIntosh Street
Thunder Bay, Ontario, P7A 1Y0

Contact:
Phone: 807-623-3793

Sunday Divine Liturgy:
10:00 am – English/Ukrainian

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We are the largest Ukrainian Catholic parish in Northwestern Ontario, established in early sixties within the Ukrainian Catholic Eparchy of Toronto. We are an active community who strive to live and spread the Gospel of Jesus Christ to those of our day. We find support in our communal prayer which is conducted mostly in English language and is in accord with the Ukrainian Byzantine Rite. We also welcome individuals and their families of different backgrounds who recognize the beauty of Byzantine Tradition and choose the Byzantine Rite to worship God.

The Church of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross was the inspiration and dream fulfilled of Rev. B. G. Shumay.
In the 1950’s Father Shumay, then pastor of the Church of the Holy Transfiguration, realized that the present church was not adequately serving the needs of the parishioners. With the steady growth of the Ukrainian Catholic community in Fort William consideration had to be given to the construction of a new church.
Funds naturally would be needed and for this purpose a campaign committee was organized and on November 22, 1959, the entire parish was canvassed for support. This initial campaign was successful and a piece of property of 3.4 acres was purchased on West Victoria Avenue. In 1964 another campaign took place to raise money for the construction of the new church. Professor Radislav Zuk, an architect well known for his Byzantine church designs, was retained. The original name of the church was Church of St. Joseph. Later the name was changed to the Church of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross.
Unfortunately during the planning years Father Shumay became ill and was confined to hospital. Father Patrick Byce was appointed administrator for the parish. He with Father Joseph Krupp as assistant carried on the enthusiasm of Father Shumay, seeing the new church progress planning stage through construction and on to eventual completion.
In the fall of the 1966 finances were such that construction could begin. The official ground breaking ceremony took place on September 25, 1966, with Father Shumay and Byce, and Father T. Harasymchuk of the Church of the Holy Protection present as well as the local architect and many parishioners.
The building of the church was completed in 1967. His Excellency, Bishop Isidore Borecky, officiated at the corner stone laying ceremony. The first Liturgy in the new church was celebrated by Father Byce, Krupp and Shumay on November 26, 1967. The next few years were spent in reducing the debt owing on the church.
In the spring of 1971 Father Byce left the parish and the church was without a permanent pastor. Weekly services were conducted by Dean J. Habrusevich from the Church of the Holy Transfiguration and Fathers E. Yarema and B. Kelleher, from the Church of the Holy Protection.
On July 15, 1972, the entire parish was saddened by the death of Father Shumay. The parish hall, The B. G. Shumay Auditorium was dedicated in his memory.
The church debt was finaly eliminated in 1972. Bishop Borecky was invited to witness the burning of the mortgage and to officially bless our church. This took place on September 17, 1972, celebrating the feast day of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross.
The year 1973 was memorable in the life of the parish. In January the parish rectory at 422 W. Victoria Avenue was purchased. In February Deacon Basil Kondusky and Mrs. Kondusky arrived to assist in serving the parish. In May we were honoured by a visit from His Beatitude Joseph Cardinal Slipyj. In October after two and half years without permanent pastor, Father Eugene Halitsky was assigned to our parish.

Location:
419 Victoria Avenue West
Thunder Bay, Ontario, P7C 1G8

Contact:
Phone: 807-577-7720
Fax: 807-577-9708
Email: holycros@tbaytel.net

Website:
holycrosstbay.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy:
10:00 am – English/Ukrainian

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Christ the King Parish
December 232014

Location:
210 Avenue Mercier
Rouyn-Noranda, Quebec, J9X 4Y1

Contact:
Phone: 819-894-9313

Sunday Divine Liturgy
-unknown-

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In 1891, two Ukrainian settlers arrived in Canada and were followed in the years 1892-1914 by another 170,000, the first and largest wave of Ukrainian immigration. These pioneers were met by a host society and a government intent on settling the frontiers of Canada. They were first directed to the agricultural frontier in western Canada and later, in the 1940’s and 1950’s to the lumber, mining and industrial frontiers in the eastern part of the country.
The new Ukrainian immigrants settled in small, resource-based communities in remote parts of eastern and northern Canada and, to a large extent, their destiny was shaped by the socio-economic structure of these one-industry towns. The history of the Ukrainian community in Val D’Or-Bourlamaque is typical of many similar ethnic communities in one-industry towns across Canada. It is also an important part of the history of the Canadian Ukrainian community, of Quebec and of Canada.
Val D’Or is located approximately 420 kilometres northwest of Montreal and about 340 kilometres north-north-west of Ottawa. The town lies along the height of the Canadian Shield and in the eastern part of the geographical formation known as the Cadillac-Bouzan Fault. Rivers in the area flow north into James Bay and only a few kilometres away, other rivers begin to flow south into the Ottawa River system.
The large Clay Belt which extends across northeastern Ontario and northwestern Quebec provides some areas of potential farm land. However, the swamp, muskeg, rocks, bush, and large numbers of lakes and rivers along with the long winters and short summers have made farming a risky gamble at best. Also, the long distances to markets and the tendency for unseasonable frost to appear, even in June, have discouraged all but the most determined farmers.
The earliest Ukrainian presence in the Abitibi region dates back to the First World War. An internment camp was established at Spirit Lake near Amos, Quebec to detain enemy aliens, that is, citizens of Austro-Hungary and Germany. Among the 1,200 “Austrian” prisoners interned at this camp, there was a large number of Galician Ukrainians, having recently immigrated from Austro-Hungary.
This internment camp was closed in 1916 after having been in operation for two years and there is no record of any Ukrainian prisoners continuing to reside in the Abitibi area after their release.
Their internment at Spirit Lake as well as in other camps across Canada left many in the Ukrainian community with distrustful attitude towards the Canadian government. Indeed, many felt that the policies if adopted against them during the First World War were not much more different from those of the governments they had fled in eastern Europe.
In 1925, Father Josaphat Jean began to establish a Ukrainian agricultural colony called “Sheptytsky.” This colony, which was named after Andrei Sheptytsky, who was the Greek Catholic Metropolitan of Galacia at that time, was located north of Amos, Quebec. Father Jean had examined potential sites in northern Alberta, but felt that the Abitibi region held out the best prospects. The colony was intended for Galacians who were then subject to Polish rule and for Ukrainian immigrants from Bosnia. Father Jean received a large grant of land from the Quebec government and started settling Ukrainian families from Montreal and new arrivals from Europe. He had great plans for this colony which he envisaged as a future centre of Ukrainian life in eastern Canada. It was slated to include a Studite monastery, a school, a cooperative, a Ukrainian library and a museum. The isolation of the area, the long winters and short growing seasons, the coming of the Deresion in 1929-30, stopped further settlement and limited the number of new Ukrainian farmers. The pioneers began to leave for other parts of Canada and by 1931, there were only 52 Ukrainians left in the colony. In 1935, the area was resettled by French-Canadian families and the settlement was renamed “Lac Castagnier.” The last few Ukrainian families continued to farm the area until the 1970’s. In 1991, there remained one family which had been part of the original settlement.

Location:
130 Rue D’Ukraine
Val D’Or, Quebec, J9P 3M2

Mailing Address:
1095 3e Rue
Val D’Or, Quebec, J9P 4A9

Contact:
Phone: 819-894-9313

Sunday Divine Liturgy
-unknown-

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St. Vladimir’s Parish
December 232014

Location:
39 2nd Street
Kirkland Lake, Ontario, P2N 1R4

Contact:
Phone: 705-567-6231

Sunday Divine Liturgy
-unknown-

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Location:
14370 Boul. Pierrefonds
Pierrefonds, Quebec, H9H 4R3

Contact:
Pastor’s Phone: 514-996-5992
Fax: 514-630-9960
Email: nazar_yuriv@yahoo.ca

Website:
facebook.com/tserkva.standrij

Sunday Divine Liturgy
9:00 am – Ukrainian/English

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There are five Ukrainian-Catholic parishes on the Island of Montreal, including St. Michael the Archangel, which was established in 1911, and is the first Ukrainian Catholic Church in the city. At St. Michael’s, many Ukrainians first worshiped, were baptized, married, or given final rites. St. Michael’s past is a memorable one to many of its older parishioners. St. Michael’s history can be traced to 1899, to the arrival in Montreal of the first Ukrainian immigrants. Of solid peasant stock, they had come to Canada seeking better lives. Many took jobs as factory workers. In October of 1902, the first Mass in their “Rite” was celebrated by a visiting Basilian Priest, in an Oblate church in the vicinity of the current parish. For many years, visiting priests were the only formal connection with the Eastern Rite. Many of these priests were travelers from the Metropolitan See of Winnipeg. They were passing through Montreal on their way to Europe. Records show that one of these priests, a French-Canadian named Fr. Sabourin, had transferred to the Eastern Rite. Various parishes were used for services during this period, including St. Anne’s, St. Eusèbe, and St. Charles’. It was not until September of 1910 that plans to build a Church were set in motion primarily by Metropolitan Andriy Sheptytsky, who was visiting Montreal to take part in the Eucharistic Congress. Incidentally, the Metropolitan was later martyred by the Soviets. The first regular pastor for the Ukrainians in the area was appointed in 1911. From then on, the liturgy was celebrated regularly in the Franciscan church of St. Anthony of Padua, on de la Gauchetière and Plessis streets. The property for the present parish complex was purchased in 1912. The pastor at the time was Fr. Desmarais, another French Canadian. Then came the War and tragedy struck the little community. As much of Ukrainian territory was then under Austrian domination — Ukraine has been subjugated by one country or another for much of its turbulent history; rarely had it been autonomous — Canada incarcerated many Ukrainians in detention camps at Petawawa and Crystal Lake, Quebec. In April 1916, the incumbent pastor called a mass meeting at which it was decided to construct a house of worship measuring eighty-five by ninety feet. Because of the war, his plans for a beautiful building were not realized and only a basement church was built. Its cornerstone was blessed by Bishop Nicetas Budka (another prelate martyred by the Communists), the first Ukrainian Catholic bishop of Canada. The church opened its doors on Easter Sunday, 1917. In 1930, construction work on the parish hall, now newly renovated, was completed. In 1954, the old basement church was razed, and the present edifice, under the supervision of Fr. Nicholas (Nick) Kushniryk, was built on the old foundation.
St. Michael’s has Byzantine towers and its interior is Byzantine as well. At the front, separating the apse from the chancel, stands a magnificent nine-foot tall “iconostasis”, or icon-stand. Made of sculptured pear-wood and polished walnut, it displays the icons of Christ the Teacher, the Blessed Mother, St. Nicholas, the four Evangelists, and the patron saint of the parish, St. Michael the Archangel. Its motif is a grapevine, which makes the iconostasis unique, in that the congregation can see through the openings into the sanctuary. There are no statues. Instead, Byzantine-style icons and murals, bearing likenesses of the saints and of Ukrainian kings, princes and ecclesiastics, grace the walls and ceiling. Also depicted are scenes from the lives of Our Lord and Our Lady. On the east wall is a huge mural portraying the martyred Ukrainian Episcopate. The mural includes likenesses of Metropolitan Sheptitsky, and Bishop Budka, both of whom figured in the history of the parish. St. Michael’s is a relatively-modern Byzantine church. It looks different from other Montreal churches, contemporary or not, because it was conceived to serve the needs of people from a different culture, whose spiritual upbringing might be unfamiliar to other Catholics. St. Michael’s fulfills a very important and necessary function for Montrealers of Ukrainian descent, and provides an opportunity for others to see how one distinctive segment of the Catholic Church fulfills its obligation to God and to man.

Location:
2388 Rue d’Iberville
Montreal, Quebec, H2K 3C6

Contact:
Pastor’s Phone: 514-521-2234
Email: tserkvamykhaila@gmail.com

Website:
stmichaelsmtl.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy
9:00 am – Ukrainian

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St. Basil the Great Parish
December 222014

Location:
875 Rue Provost
Lachine, Quebec, H8S 1M8

Contact:
Pastor’s Phone: 514-769-3804
Pastor’s Email: v.vitt@hotmail.com

Website:
facebook.com/UkrainianCatholicChurchInMontreal

Sunday Divine Liturgy
9:00 am – Ukrainian (first Sunday of the month)
11:00 am – Ukrainian (every other Sunday of the month)

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Holy Ghost Parish
December 222014

Holy Ghost Parish first showed signs of its spiritual life on January 19, 1912, when Father Theodore Dvulit performed the consecration of water outside Saint-Gabriel church on Center Street. At the time, classes in Ukrainian were offered at the local Catholic School and a chapter of the Prosvita Society was also founded there. In 1929 the Sisters Servants took over teaching Ukrainian youth. On February 23, 1931, the first meeting of neighborhood parishioners was held, where a church committee was elected and fundraising for building a new church was initiated.

Father Josaphat Tymochko OSBM became the first pastor. In 1934, land was purchased for construction of the church. During Father Josaphat Jean’s short tenure as parish priest here, the church hall was built. However, due to the war and a shortage of building materials, building the church came later.

The church’s cornerstone was finally consecrated and laid on June 29, 1947; the ceremony was overseen by Father Benjamin Baranyk, Superior of the Basilian Fathers in Canada. Finally on March 7 the following year, the first Mass was celebrated in the newly built church, with 495 people receiving Holy Communion that day. The Very Reverend Bishop Isidore Borecky consecrated the church on June 27, 1948 in a grand ceremony. In 1953 the church interior was painted by painter Leonid Parfetsky, whereas the choirs, the sacristy and the vestibule – by painter Volodymyr Moshynsky.

Many pastors served this parish. In chronological order: Fr. Teodor Dvulit, Fr. Ivan Perepylytsya, Fr. Mykhaylo Hryhoriychuk, Fr. Yosafat Tymochko, Fr. Hryhoriy Trukh, Fr. Josaphat Jean, Fr. Pavlo Hevko, Fr. Christopher Kondratiuk, Fr. Sevastian Shevchuk, Fr. Markian Pasicznyk, Fr. Nicholas Siryy, Fr. Volodymyr Verbitsky, Fr. Nykolay Markiv, Fr. Mychaylo Horoshko, Fr. Yaroslav Haymanovych, Fr. Hryhoriy Onufriv, Fr. Lev Chayka, Fr. Stefan Kolyankivsky, Fr. Ivan Hawryluk, Fr. Serhij Gar and Fr. Oleh Koretski. Our latest pastor, Fr. Volodymyr Vitt, has served our church since September 2001.

To date, the parish operates a branch of the UCWLC (Ukrainian Catholic Women’s League of Canada), which is headed by the enthusiastic Ms. Maria Hruszowska, who by her own example inspires everyone to work for the good of our parish. And, although the majority of our members are of advanced age, they work tirelessly, organizing numerous events and care for the welfare and beauty of this church.

The parish church committee is headed by Mrs. Marianna Nestorowich, who enjoys much prestige and respect among all our parishioners. Together with her husband, Mykhailo, they selflessly and with great dedication work for the good of our community. There are never any events or performances without their active participation. Be it organizing and conducting meetings of the Church Committee, the traditional Kutya and Sviachene (the Chrismas and Easter communal luncheons, respectively), running the bingo, maintaining church records, overseeing the cleanliness and proper technical condition of the church building and parish hall – all this, and more, rests upon their shoulders. Every Sunday Mrs. Marianna joins the ranks of the church choir, and during the week, together with Ms. Maria Hruszowska, she assists the pastor during Holy Masses for private intentions

Breaking bread together in celebration of religious milestones have become a cherished tradition, starting with the Parish Kutya, which we have at Christmas-time, and the Sviachene which takes place during the Easter period, along with the weekly coffee and baked goods served on Sundays following Mass. The ever popular Bingo for the seniors of our parish is held every Tuesday at one o’clock in the afternoon in our church parish hall.

Four altar boys minister at the altar and the choir’s singing exalts both Sunday and holyday worship. Mr. Stephan Melnyk, who recently celebrated his 90th birthday, is the oldest active member and still performs his cantor’s functions during worship.

For obvious political reasons, many young people have left the province of Quebec over the years, and immigration quotas for those wishing to come to Canada from Ukraine are very small. Even for those who have immigrated here, learning two new languages isn’t easy, but people do manage to adapt and integrate themselves within Quebec society. Therefore, the number of parishioners in Montreal and the surrounding area has been decreasing dramatically over a long period of time. Most of our parishioners are 70 to 80 years old.

We are very happy to say that, in the last two years, several young immigrant families from Ukraine, with children of all ages, have joined our ranks, and we hope that this trend continues. The community extends its hospitality in every way possible to help the newcomers feel welcome. So far this approach seems to be working, as the new members tell us they feel comfortable and accepted.

Although each and every year we see around 6 or 8 of our parishioners pass on, our parish manages to maintain its membership at around 70 families.

Location:
1795 Rue Grand Trunk
Montreal, Quebec, H3K 1M1

Mailing Address:
1770 Rue Centre
Montreal, Quebec, H3K 1H7

Contact:
Pastor’s Phone: 514-769-3804
Pastor’s Email: v.vitt@hotmail.com

Website:
ughgc.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy
9:00 am – Ukrainian (every orther Sunday of the month)
11:00 am – Ukrainian (first Sunday of the month)

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On December 17th, following Sunday Divine Liturgy, parishioners convened their first meeting, and elected a committee to help the pastor with the parish’s affairs. The initial members were: Boris Gregoryj, Paul Dubas, Leo Ivashchuk, Wasyl Kozak, Mykhaylo Kosiuk, Alexander Lysyuk, Peter Rogal, Constantine Telishevskyi, Wasyl Shevchuk and Rudolf Schmidt. The committee elected Mr. Kostya Telishevskyi as its first president for his great organizational skills and zealous work.
The committee, together with Fr Michael Hawryluk, began fundraising among the parishioners and looking for a plot of land on which to build the church. Two properties were bought – one from private owners, and the second from the municipality. The first property was soon re-sold for a good price once it was decided that a large church building would be built on the other property. Expert builders were brought in, including master builder Mr Volodymyr Postryhach, at a meeting held on May 21st, 1954. Members of the building committee included: Postryhach Volodymyr – Chairman, Telishevskyi Kostya – Deputy Chairman, Danylevych Yaroslav – secretary, and counselors – Shmytd Rudolph, James Kaminsky and Kosiuk Vasil. They went to work right away. The committee’s Chairman took care of finding the architect, Mr Paul Émile Lapointe, who devised the building plans. Actual building of the structure was entrusted to general contractor Mr. Stephen Sura.
The land was consecrated after almost four years after the founding of the parish, on June 6, 1954, with many priests and faithful in attendance. Following the consecration rites, a dinner was held in the parish hall of St. Michael the Archangel church on Iberville with the participation of delegates – representatives from other parishes and national organizations, and faithful.
The foundations for the church were started in September 1954 and completed, but due to inclement weather in late autumn construction was postponed to the following Spring, in April 1955. Many people watched the building going up and assisted in its quick progress. The solemn consecration of the cornerstone took place on September 25th, 1955 by His Excellency Isidore Borecky with many priests, parishioners and guests on hand. With the outside completed, the entire winter season was spent finishing the interior, so that on February 26th, 1956, the opening and dedication of the church hall was held.
Three domes and shiny stainless steel crosses were added by summer 1956. Now all attention was placed in decorating the interior with all that is needed to celebrate Holy Mass. The first Divine Liturgy in the newly built church was celebrated on Christmas Day, January 7th, 1957, followed by the solemn consecration of the church by the Bishop for Ukrainian Catholics in Eastern Canada, His Excellency Isidore Borecky, on 26th May 1957, with a large attendance from the community.
Our Bishops, first His Excellency Isidore , then Bishop Cornelius and now Bishop Stephen , cared deeply that the spiritual needs of the large congregation of the Assumption in Rosemount were adequately met. With that in mind, in December 1954 Fr Prof. Stephen Kolyankivsky was appointed as assistant to Fr. Michael Hawryluk. In later years many more priests came to serve the faithful; some stayed for a short period of time, others—longer. Among them were also recently ordained priests who graduated from local Montreal theological colleges: Fr. Yurij Kowalsky and Fr. Edward Yarema. Thus the following priests served this parish: Fr. Prof. Stephen Kolyankivsky, Fr. Nicholas Markiv, Fr. Yurij Kowalsky, Fr. Volodymyr Verbitsky and Fr. Edward Yarema.
On October 10th, 1962, His Excellency Bishop Isidore  appointed a second parish pastor: Archpriest Fr. Dr. Michael Zaleski, a professor in the Department of Slavonic Studies at Université de Montréal. He arrived at the parish on November 10th, 1962; Fr. Michael Hawryluk stayed on as assistant.
On Sunday, April 4th, 1965, Bishop Isidore ordained Fr. Vasyl Bryniawsky and appointed him chaplain at our parish. July 1st, 1965 Fr. Dr. Michael Zaleski passed away. The third pastor to join our parish was Archpriest Fr. Anthony Cymbalisty, from Sudbury, Ontario. Fr. Bryniawsky at this point left to take over the duties of pastor at the parish of St. Basil in Lachine and the parish of St. John the Baptist in Park Extension. On May 2nd, 1966, Fr. Michael Hawryluk died. It wasn’t until November of that year, that an assistant priest from the northern Quebec parishes – Val D’Or, Rouyn-Noranda and others – came to join: Fr. Jaroslav Haymanovych.
Father Anthony Cymbalisty served our parish for nine years, until October 1974, when he was transferred to a parish in Hamilton, Ontario by Bishop Isidore. In his place, Bishop Isidore appointed pastor, Fr. Councilor Ivan Hawryluk, who served our parish the longest.
In May 1999, Fr. Volodymyr Vitt became the first priest hailing from Ukraine to join our parish, from a country that had only recently emerged from behind the Soviet Iron Curtain. Father Volodymyr’s pastoral ministry continued until 2001, leaving memories of himself as a priest, musician and writer.
In 2001, Bishop Cornelius appointed Fr. Oleh Koretski, who before this served the parish of the Holy Spirit in Point-Saint-Charles. The newly appointed pastor fulfilled his priestly ministry for ten years together with assistant priests Fr. Ihor Oshchipko and Fr. Nazar Yuriv, who served in rotation, until his sudden death on June 8 2013. The late Father Oleh was a good preacher and an outstanding expert in the Scriptures and his extraordinary tenor will remain in the memory of our parishioners.
On November 1st, 2013 His Excellency Bishop Stephen, present Eparch of Toronto and Eastern Canada, appointed Fr. Ihor Oshchipko, who was ordained in our parish, exactly ten years ago,  during which time he served in our church as assistant-priest and ministered in our city’s founding parish, St. Michael Archangel on Iberville Street .
During the past 60 years, our parish in Rosemont has seen many dedicated pastors as well as members of the church council who dedicated themselves in developing a thriving spiritual life in our community while safeguarding its administrative and financial needs. It would be impossible to name the countless individual committee members who selflessly contributed to the cause, but will limit ourselves to remember the chairmen. The first Chairman was Mr Kostya Telishevsky. During his tenure the church was built and developed. Me Basil Danchyshyn came next, the first judge of Ukrainian descent in the province of Quebec, on whose advice additional land was purchased in order to increase the area of the church’s property. Then followed Dr. Roman Struminsky, Mr. Theodore Parhin, Prof. Jaroslav Dvozhak, entrepreneur Wasyl Hladky and last, but not least, Mr Myroslav Balycky. Together with the committee members they faithfully take care of our parish’s administrative and financial affairs, with the full understanding and in coordination with our pastors.
Many religious organizations contribute in keeping the parish vigorous: the Sisterhood Apostleship of Prayer, whose leader from its inception was Mrs. Stephanie Rakush, then later Mrs. Stanislava Hirnyak; the Ukrainian Catholic Women’s League (LUKZH), whose long-time head is Mrs. Bohdanna Klecor-Hawryluk; the Young Parishioners Society; the Church Choir under the longstanding artistic direction of Mrs. Maria Czoli; the Ukrainian Catholic Youth; (UCY); the Ukrainian Catholic Young Men Organization(OKYMM); the Altar Boys and the Children of Mary that are overseen by the Venerable Congregation of the Sisters Servants of Mary Immaculate, and especially Sister Lawrencia Semyaniv who, for many years, prepares our children for their first sacraments of Confession and solemn Holy Communion.

Location:
6175 10th Avenue
Montreal, Quebec, H1Y 2H5

Contact:
Phone: 514-729-8842
Fax: 514-729-5357
Email: ihor@poklik.com

Website:
abvmparishblog.wordpress.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy
9:00 am – Ukrainian
11:00 am – Ukrainian

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Location:
422 David Street
Welland, Ontario, L3B 2B8

Contact:
Phone: 905-735-9846

Sunday Divine Liturgy
9:00 am – English
10:30 am – Ukrainian

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Location:
6248 Main Street
Niagara Falls, Ontario, L2G 6A4

Contact:
Phone: 905-354-7876
Fax: 905-354-7876
Email: stmaryschurch@cogeco.ca

Website: 
stmarysukrainian.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy
10:30 am – Ukrainian/English

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St. John Ukrainian Catholic Church was established by Bishop Isodore Borecky in March of 1981. The first Sunday service was celebrated on April 5, 1981, at Assumption School on the corner of Parnell and Niagara Streets. Services were held there for nearly three years, as the development of the church and parish went through many exciting stages.
First there was the acquisition of land for our future church at 85 Lakeshore Rd. Then there was the clearing of the old smoke sheds, broken greenhouses, garage and barn, the demolishing of the old Avondale Store, and the readying of the site for the building of our church. Many fund-raising events were held, i.e. picnics, flea markets, dances, raffles … and many sacrificial donations made toward the building fund of our church. A large number of ladies of our parish, supported by a faithful number of men, incessantly worked (and still work) at making pyrohy, cabbage rolls, pies and other baked goods for sale, to enable us all to enjoy a church of our own. All this and much more, the clergy and faithful together brought about the blessings of the Lord, so that on October 3, 1982, the foundation stone was laid to signal the beginning of the building of our church. This was followed by the preparation of the site for services and the erection of footings. In the spring of 1983, the steel was ordered and subsequently erected in June and July of that year. Once the steel structure was up, the church began to take better and better shape every day. The obtaining of a joint cost-sharing grant from the federal and provincial government greatly encouraged all those involved. By late fall of 1983, the church was already recognizable as such from the outside: by late winter it was recognizable as such on the inside as well. On April 8, 1984, exactly three years since the first service at Assumption School, and after an outpouring of volunteer men who helped in painting and staining the church and total parish involvement in cleaning it, Bishop Isidore Borecky blessed the church and led in all the clergy and faithful for our first Divine Liturgy celebration. What a memorable and beautiful day it was!
During the next few months, the church was already being used for daily services while the remainder of the work was brought to completion. The summer months were used to complete the stucco finishing of the outside of the church and the preparation of the grounds for landscaping. In September, the sod was laid, giving the church and grounds a fresh new look in time for the next memorable event -the Consecration of the Church on October 21, 1984.
Since the establishment of the parish, our membership has grown to about 180 families and is constantly expanding. Already we have developed a vibrant parish life. We have an active Parish Council, Women’s Association, Senior Citizens’ Association, Youth Activity Group and Alter Boys Group. Our Liturgical Singing Group leads the congregation in singing at services in both Ukrainian and English. We have a Catechetical Team and provide religious education programs for children, youth and adults. Along with general fund-raising, most of the major needs (including office work, care of alter linens, and building and land maintenance) are all done by VOLUNTEERS!

Location:
91 Lakeshore Road
St. Catharines, Ontario, L2N 2T6

Contact:
Phone: 905-937-3393
Fax: 905-935-0881
Email: stjohnukrainian@bellnet.ca

Website: 
stjohnuc.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy
10:00 am – Ukrainian/English

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The first Ukrainian pioneers who settled in St. Catharines were Hnat Nazar in 1912, and Hryhoriy Horhota who came from Toronto in 1914.However, Ukrainian settlement in the Niagara peninsula started quite late. Ukrainians were lured by the wheat fields of the prairies more than by the fruit orchards and industry until 1929. In St. Catharines and vicinity there were not more than a hundred Ukrainians, scattered over the whole area, and poorly organized. Thorold was more densely populated with Ukrainians. Construction of the Welland Canal with its high dykes between Thorold and St. Catharines, paper mills in Thorold and Merritton, and the automotive industry in the 1930 s attracted more Ukrainians to this area. About this time also, when our farmers from the Canadian prairies learned about Niagara fruit farming, and other ways of earning a living, some ventured East to re-settle in this region.
The second wave of Ukrainian settlers began after World War II. Political persecution compelled a greater number of immigrants to leave their native land and seek freedom and fortune in Canada. About the time of World War II, St. Catharines could pride itself with the Ukrainian National Federation, a Credit Union, a Ukrainian School, theatrical groups, and other organizations. Since 1937, Ukrainian church services were held irregularly in private homes, usually in the home of Paul Gulaj who owned a car and could bring priests for church services. Rev. Wolodymyr Shek from Buffalo, Rev. Hladkyj from Welland, Rev. Michael Zajac, and Basilian Fathers from Grimsby provided the religious services in St. Catharines.
In 1939, the Niagara region was placed under the pastoral care of a young energetic Father Isidore Borecky who resided in Brantford. Now, services were held on a more regular basis, in the basement of the Cathedral of St. Catherine of Alexandria. In 1942, the first church committee made up of Stefan Wojtowych, Nick Baraniuk, Michael Lastewka, Peter Fabian, Paul Sarhaniuk, and Paul Gulaj took upon themselves the responsibility of preparing plans for a church. In 1943, a plot of land was acquired for $600 at the intersection of QEW and Niagara St. A well known architect, Rev. Philip Ruh, who already had designed and built many Byzantine style Ukrainian churches in Western Canada and Ontario agreed to finalize the plans and build the church. Construction began in the spring of 1944. By fall of that year, the basement, in the shape of the cross, was almost completed and covered. Next May, this basement was consecrated and, from this time, Divine Liturgies were celebrated in our own building.
Further construction progressed very slowly because in the post-war years, building materials and finances were hard to come by. In August of 1947, Bishop of Canadian Ukrainians, Vasylij Ladyka, of Winnipeg, visited St. Catharines, and blessed the corner stone for the new church. Many post-war Ukrainian immigrants to Canada found their way to St. Catharines. They soon turned to their churches, to the established organizations, and enriched Ukrainian community life.
In 1948, the Holy See created four exarchs for Ukrainian Catholics in Canada, and the Rev. Isidore Borecky from this parish became the first Bishop of Toronto. To take his place in St. Catharines, the new Bishop assigned Rev. Wasyl Filevych — a young Canadian-born priest. Father Filevych completed building the church, crowning its summit with the cross. On January 1, 1950, Bishop Borecky consecrated the completed church, enabling all services to be held there.
During the next ten years, under the pastoral care of Father Jaroslaw Chyz, the parish built the residence, installed permanent pews, and paid off the existing mortgage.
From October of 1962, V. Rev. Mykola Komar, now the fourth priest in this parish, was assigned to carry out pastoral duties here, and continued at that post for 37 years (!) until September of 1999. In the first few years, the stained glass windows were finished, the church yard was completed, and the mortgage on the parish school building was paid off. This building housed Ukrainian school classes, various Ukrainian organization meetings, youth activities; meetings of the Myrhorod Senior Citizen s Club, parish dinners, and other community activities. The next phase of growth was the iconography of the interior of the church done by Igor Suhacev. (See our site under the heading “Divine Liturgy”). The church has a full three-level iconostasis, new altars, four chandeliers — all through the generosity of the parishioners. Above the north side altar, is the copy of the miraculous icon of Borusiw.
The solemn blessing of the iconostasis and the interior iconography was performed by His Beatitude Patriarch Josyf Slipyj, October 8, 1976.The greatest attention and concentration of effort in this pastoral assignment was focused on the young generation. In this phase of growth and development of the parish, there were 30—40 children for First Communion; up to 90 children annually attended Ukrainian School. The parish had a church choir and church organizations such as the Ukrainian Catholic Women s League (UCWL), and the Brotherhood of Ukrainian Catholics (BUC). Of great credit to the parish is the fact that the numerous members of the parish youth who moved out and settled in other communities, involved themselves in parish and community life assuming leading positions there.
Memorable events in the life of the parish will always be visitations of illustrious church dignitaries: His Beatitude Patriarch Josyf Slipyj, who visited this parish on three occasions, Patriarch Myroslaw Lubachiwskyj, Bishop Vasyl Velychkovsky, Bishop Gabriel Bukatko, Archbishop Volodymyr Sterniuk, Bishop Pavlo Vasylyk, and other leading personages of the church or state, whom the whole community of St. Catharines actively welcomed. Of course our Eparchial Bishops of Toronto visited our parish on numerous occasions: Bishop Isidore Borecky, Bishop Roman Danylak, Bishop Cornelius Pasichny and Bishop Stephen Chmilar.
In 1997, Sts. Cyril and Methodius Church was officially designated historic, making it the fifth heritage church in St. Catharines.
As of September, 1999, the pastor has been Rev. Bohdan Choly. Rev. Bohdan and Presbytera Tanya have 6 wonderful children.
The parish enjoys full co-operation and support of all Ukrainian national organizations; a fraternal relationship with the Ukrainian Catholic Church of St. John the Evangelist and an amicable relationship with the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of St. George. Bowing our heads before the hardship and the achievements of our pioneers, we express our sincere gratitude to all the faithful and honorable labourers in Christ’s vineyard in this parish, members of the Parish Council, leaders and members of the church organizations for the work and love, which they dedicated to this parish from its arduous beginnings until this day.

Location:
14 Rolls Avenue
St. Catharines, Ontario, L2N 1W1

Contact:
Phone: 905-646-1275
Pastor’s Email: pastor@cyrilandmethodius.ca

Website: 
cyrilandmethodius.ca

Sunday Divine Liturgy
9:00 am – English
10:30 am – Ukrainian

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Location:
1045 Rosedale Avenue
Sarnia, Ontario, N7S 1Z5

Contact:
Phone: 519-542-9903
Pastor’s Email: winnicki@rogers.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy
9:30 am – Ukrainian/English

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Location:
601 Lake Trail Drive
Windsor, Ontario, N9G 2M3

Contact:
Rectory Phone: 519-254-7927
Church Office: 519-973-4872
Fax: 519-254-6334
Church Email: stsvowindsor@gmail.com
Pastor’s Email: pastor.stsvowindsor@gmail.com

Website: 
stsvladimirandolgachurch.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy
9:30 am – Ukrainian
11:30 am – English

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Location:
95 Thompson Road
Waterford, Ontario, N0E 1Y0

Contact:
Pastor’s Phone: 416-843-3799
Email: bogdanmiro@rogers.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy
11:00 am – Ukrainian

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Location:
131 Victoria Street South
Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 2B6

Contact:
Phone: 519-742-4172
Pastor’s Phone: 226-220-0310
Email: TserkvaSpasa@rogers.com

Website: 
holytransfigurationkw.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy
10:00 am – Ukrainian

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Christ the King Parish
December 202014

The building of a church on our present Nelson Street site began in 1952. The was made possible when a third wave of Ukrainian immigrants began to populate London and southwestern Ontario after the Second World War.
The young men and women who came here had just survived the horrors of conflict in Europe- a survival that was realized far away from their native soil, thanks in great part to their deep faith.
Father Hawryk was the first pastor of the brand new London parish. The building committee, church council, the Ukrainian Catholic Women’s League, and our church- goers worked tirelessly to realize their own place of worship in their new land.

Location:
707 Nelson Street
London, Ontario, N7Z 1J8

Contact:
Phone: 519-434-6593
Fax: 519-660-4927
Pastor’s Email: ihor.petyk081@sympatico.ca

Website: 
ctkucc.ca

Sunday Divine Liturgy
9:00 am – English
10:30 am – Ukrainian

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Location:
111 Second Street
Welland, Ontario, L3B 4T8

Contact:
Phone: 905-735-3433
Fax: 905-735-3823
Pastor’s Email: frnicholasdeak@sympatico.ca

Sunday Divine Liturgy
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Location:
821 Upper Wentworth Street
Hamilton, Ontario, L9A 4W5

Contact:
Phone: 905-383-9744
Email: renaldo.kekis@sympatico.ca

Sunday Divine Liturgy
10:00 am – Ukrainian/English

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Location:
260 Melvin Avenue
Hamilton, Ontario, L8H 2K2

Contact:
Phone: 905-545-8002
Fax: 905-545-5330
Email: alopatniuk@sympatico.ca

Sunday Divine Liturgy
9:30 am – Ukrainian/English

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Location:
521 West 5th Street
Hamilton, Ontario, L9C 3P7

Contact:
Phone: 905-735-7005
Pastor’s Phone: 905-389-6689
Email: holyspiritchurch@cogeco.net

Sunday Divine Liturgy
11:45 am – English/Hungarian

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Holy Spirit Parish
December 192014

Location:
15 St. Olga Street
Hamilton, Ontario, L8L 6R3

Contact:
Phone: 905-545-2914
Fax: 905-547-4900
Email: holyspiritchurch@cogeco.net

Sunday Divine Liturgy
8:30 am – Ukrainian
10:00 am – Ukrainian
12:00 pm – English

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Our parish is celebrating 60 years in the Guelph community. The first liturgy at the Holy Protection of the Mother of God Ukrainian Catholic Church was held in October 1955 on the feast day of the Holy Protection of the Mother of God.

In December 1951, a committee was formed. In the summer of 1952 the lot was purchased from the City of Guelph with the help of the Catholic Church Extension. Soon after, on October 12, 1952, the lot was consecrated. Ewhen Gren was granted the architect. The long awaited construction began in spring of 1954 with raising $5,000. The basement was completed in 1954. About 10 years later, in 1962, the domes were completed and hoisted onto the church.

The Iconostasis was an ongoing project. Adriadna and Oleg Krayevsky designed and created the intricate “Ukrainian Baroque” Iconostasis. The development was between 1963-1993.

Location:
115 York Road
Guelph, Ontario, N1E 3E7

Contact:
Phone: 519-837-1642
Pastor’s Email: fatherandrij@gmail.com

Website: 
holyprotectionmotherofgod.wordpress.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy
11:00 am – Ukrainian

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Location:
344 Main Street
Courtland, Ontario, N0J 1E0

Contact:
Phone: 519-688-2230
Pastor’s Phone: 519-688-2210

Sunday Divine Liturgy
9:00 am – English
10:00 am – Hungarian

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St. Michael’s Ukrainian Catholic Church has a long and proud history in service to the Ukrainian community in Coniston since it’s establishment in 1928. The church is located at the corner of Walter and William Streets in Coniston, where weekly services are held for it’s faithful congregation, many of whom are descended from the original Ukrainian pioneers who settled in the Coniston area in the early 1900’s.
St. Michaels celebrated the 60th anniversary of the opening of it’s current church and rectory on Saturday November 24, 2012 with a Pontifical Divine Liturgy held in the church followed by a praznyk at the Colonial Inn. These events were attended by the Most Rev. Stephen Chmilar, bishop of the Ukrainian Catholic Eparchy of Toronto in tribute to this historic milestone.

Location:
48 William Street
Coniston, Ontario, P0M 1M0

Contact:
Phone: 705-675-8244
Fax: 705-675-1581

Saturday Divine Liturgy
11:00 am – Ukrainian

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Location:
St. Joseph’s Roman Catholic Church
180 Wellington Street West
Chatham, Ontario N7M 1J6

Contact:
Phone: 519-962-3814

Sunday Divine Liturgy
1:00pm (1st & 3rd Sunday of the month)

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Location:
582 Eagle Street N.
Cambridge, Ontario, N3H 1C3

Contact:
Phone: 519-653-9841
Pastor’s Email: fatherandrij@gmail.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy
9:00 am – Ukrainian

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Location:
419 Pearl Street
Burlington, Ontario, L7R 2N2

Contact:
Phone: 905-634-6598
Fax: 905-681-6758
Email: holyprotection-burlington@cogeco.ca

Website: 
hpucc.ca

Sunday Divine Liturgy
9:00 am – Ukrainian
10:30 am – English

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St. John the Baptist Parish
December 192014

The first Ukrainian families who came to Brantford, left Buffalo, New York in 1902. Three years later, in 1905, another fifty (50) families arrived from Detroit, Michigan. These Ukrainian families established the oldest Ukrainian Catholic Church Community in Ontario.
These early groups of Ukrainians came from the western mountain ranges of Ukraine called Lemkiwshchyna and were called “Lemkos”.
These Ukrainians named the Church Community “Ruthenian Catholic Church of St. John the Baptist” in honour of their own home community in Ukraine.
The first Ukrainians who arrived in Brantford settled on Buffalo Street, which got its name from the first people to settle there who were also from Buffalo, NY. They shared their adventures, joys and sorrows during those early days.
The life of the first Ukrainians in Brantford was difficult. They encountered many hardships, the worst of which was their inability to speak English. They quickly learned the language and brought with them their faith, hope and love for their own traditions, customs and church life, which was the centre of their community.
In 1907, just before Christmas, the first Church Committee was elected. Members of a special committee were Mike Madarasz, Dmytro Walkowycz, Wasyl Romanczak and Iwan Kastranee. The people raised money for a building fund by singing traditional Ukrainian Christmas Carols. It took three years to raise enough money. Originally, the plan was to buy a piece of land on High Street but in 1910, Fr. Herka and his parishioners decided to buy the land at 100 Terrace Hill Street. There were three acres of land and a building. The top floor of the building was used as a place of worship and the lower level for a Ukrainian school, meeting place and clergy residence.
During the period of 1902 to 1910, services were held in private homes. In 1911, the Brotherhood of the Parish of St. John the Baptist was formed with Michael Pontus as President, Stefan Serdyskyj as Secretary, Stefan Kowalyk as Vice-President and Michael Madarasz as Treasurer. St. Basil’s Roman Catholic Parish School was used for Sunday Liturgies (Mass) and other services until 1917. In 1928, tragedy struck the Ukrainian community when the building burnt down. However, with the insurance money as a base, a new Building Program was started. It took a lot of hard work, prayers and solidarity to create a new image within this community.
Up until 1935, there was no permanent pastor for this Church and over thirty priests were involved with its spiritual and social growth. Most of the priests came from Buffalo or Detroit and had to return to their own communities after spending several weeks in Brantford. In 1935, the Bishop of the Basilian Fathers assigned Fr. Joseph Bala to help the people.
In 1938, through the grace of God, this Parish got its first full time resident priest, Fr. Isidore Borecky. His talents and love for the Church and its people were instrumental in raising the standards of this community to a very high level.
Fr. Isidore fostered and encouraged the spiritual, cultural and traditional Ukrainian life. Not only was Brantford fortunate enough to receive these blessings, but so was all of Southern Ontario that was under his care and influence.
In 1948, Brantford was granted a mixed blessing. Fr. Isidore Borecky was being elevated to the position of Bishop. Brantford was rejoicing at the honour that was being presented to His Excellency but there was sadness in the knowledge that he would be leaving us.
The iconostasis was built in 1962, and the current icons were added to it in 1983. The icons painted on the walls and ceiling around the altar were completed 1998 and 1999. The parish celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2011.

Location:
92 Terrace Hill Street
Brantford, Ontario, N3R 1G3

Contact:
Phone: 519-752-9290
Fax: 519-752-0923
Pastor’s Phone: 416-843-3799
Email: contact@stjohnbrantford.com
Pastor’s Email: bogdanmiro@rogers.com

Website: 
stjohnbrantford.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy
9:00 am – Ukrainian/English

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Location:
4426 Ontario Street
Beamsville, Ontario, L0R 1B0

Contact:
Phone: 905-572-1723
Email: alopatniuk@sympatico.ca

Sunday Divine Liturgy
-unknown-

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St. Sophia Parish
November 152014

St. Sophia is an Eastern Catholic parish serving the North Texas area, especially the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex, including Addison, Allen, Arlington, Bedford, Carrollton, Coppell, Dallas, Denton, Euless, Flower Mound, Fort Worth, Frisco, Garland, Grand Prairie, Hurst, Irving, Lewisville, Little Elm, McKinney, Mesquite, North Richland Hills, Pilot Point, Plano, Richardson, Rockwall, and Wylie.

Location
5600 N Colony Blvd, The Colony, TX 75056

Contact
Phone/Fax: 972-370-4700
Email: webmaster@stsophiaukrainian.cc

Website
StSophiaUkrainian.cc

Liturgical Schedule
Sunday: 10 AM Divine Liturgy (Eng/Ukr)
1st, 3rd, 5th Wednesdays: 7 PM Vespers (Eng)
Weekday Feast Days: 7 PM (Eng/Ukr)
Saturday Feast Days: 10 AM (Eng/Ukr)
Confession: 30 minutes before or after any service and by appointment
Please check the website/bulletin to confirm times and to see the Lenten/Paschal schedules.

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When Ukrainian immigrants arrived in Rhode Island in the late Nineteenth Century, they found work in mills throughout the Blackstone River Valley. Although their early years in America were extremely difficult, these immigrants quickly formed church parishes, among them our parish.

Today, after more than a century, the parish of Saint Michael the Archangel continues to serve Rhode Island and central Massachusetts; and, through video broadcasts of our Divine Liturgies over the Internet, our parish now serves the world.

Our current priest, Rev. Msgr. Roman Golemba, has served the parish since 1997. He is an accomplished photographer, and one will often see him, camera and flash in hand, at church events. He is also a walking database of jokes who always seems to have one appropriate for any situation. Ordained in 1974, Fr. Roman served several parishes in New York and Connecticut before joining St. Michael’s.

We are a small parish, consisting of about 70 persons, and a handful of viewers on the Internet. Quite often, after Sunday Divine Liturgy, we will gather in the basement hall of the church for coffee and a light lunch.

We are governed by our priest, two trustees who are selected by the parish priest, and an advisory committee of five persons elected by the parishioners at our annual meeting. Our Ladies Sodality group actively raises money for a variety of projects that benefit the parish.

We respect our the traditions of former generations, and the passage of time is marked with annual events: the blessing of water during Theophany and of food baskets during Pascha (Easter), the summer parish picnic, the parish luncheon celebrating the feast day of Saint Michael the Archangel in November, and a visit by Saint Nicholas (but not Santa Claus) in December.

We also respect our ethnic heritage by celebrating our Sunday Divine Liturgies in Ukrainian. Our Saturday Divine Liturgy serves those who prefer to celebrate in English. Like most Ukrainian Catholic parishes in the U.S., we observe the New (Gregorian) Calendar.

Location
394 Blackstone Street
Woonsocket, Rhode Island 02895

Contact
Phone: 401-762-2733

Website
stmichaelsri.org

Sunday Divine Liturgy
16:00 (Saturdays) – English
11:00 (Sundays) – Ukrainian

St. Michael the Archangel parish broadcasts Sunday Divine Lturgies live – click here

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On the night of January 24 to 25, 1999, the oldest church of the Eparchy (Sts. Peter and Paul, Grindrod), burned to the ground. Two joined-together portables have been placed on the site of the former church, one serving as the hall, the second as the church. More information is available in Okanagan Historical Society Report No. 43.

Location
Carlin Street and 3rd Avenue, Grindrod, BC

Contact
P.O. Box 115, Grindrod, BC V0E 1Y0

Divine Liturgy
16:00 Saturdays

Updated
November 8, 2014

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St. George Parish
November 82014

Location
2414 Vanier Drive
Prince George, BC V2N 1T7

Contact
Phone: 250-562-2933
Email: euxarist@shaw.ca

Sunday Divine Liturgy
10:00 – Ukrainian/English

Daily Divine Liturgy
09:00 – Ukrainian/English

Updated
November 8, 2014

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St. Josaphat Parish
November 82014

St. Josaphat’s looks after the oldest Ukrainian Catholic Church in British Columbia, that being St. Nicholas Ukrainian Catholic Church and cemetery in Coldstream. A Divine Liturgy is celebrated in May by the parishioners of Vernon to honour St. Nicholas and to remember the pioneers of the church.

Location
2210 40 Avenue, Vernon, BC V1T 8Z9

Contact
Phone: 250-549-1327
Email: st.josaphat@gmail.com

Website
http://www3.telus.net/stjosaphat/vernon/index.html

Sunday Divine Liturgy
10:00 – Ukrainian/English

Daily Divine Liturgy
09:00 (Tue-Fri)

Updated
November 8, 2014

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Location
408 – 5th Street
New Westminster, BC  V3L 2X6

Contact
Phone: 604-522-7711
Email: office@holyeucharist.ca

Website
holyeucharist.ca

Sunday Divine Liturgy
08:30 – English
10:30 – Ukrainian

Daily Divine Liturgy
08:30 (Tue-Sat) – English

Updated
November 8, 2014

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A little history…

From May 24, 1911 until 1927, Vancouver was a center of missionary activity for Ukrainian Catholics in the surrounding area. In 1927, with the purchase of a parcel of land with a chapel and a residence on Fraser Street, the parish of St Stephen’s Greek Catholic Church was established. In 1937, the Order of St. Basil the Great began serving the pastoral needs of this community.

The community grew, and the parish purchased the Swedish Lutheran Church on Princess and Pender in 1944. The first Divine Liturgy in the new church was celebrated on May 7, 1944.

The church was named the Protection of the Blessed Virgin Mary now commonly known as St Mary’s Ukrainian Catholic Parish. This property was sold and the last Divine Liturgy was held on August 4, 1968.

To accommodate the further growing of the parish, the present site at 550 West 14th Avenue in Vancouver was ,purchased on June 15, 1962. The first Divine Liturgy was held in open air on September 9, 1962 with more than 1,500 parishioners participating. Of the several buildings on the site, a former laundry facility was retained and renovated in 1963 into the parish center. Initially used for Sunday services, the building was refurbished and modernized a number of times over the years. This building became known as the Ukrainian Catholic Centre. A monastic residence and a temporary hurch were built and opened in 1968.

After many years of fund raising, the present byzantine style church, designed by renowned New York City architect Julian Jastremsky was constructed and opened in 1982. Stained glass windows, icons and mosaics in the church, designed by renowned iconographer Boris Makarenko and his son Sviatoslav, were installed over a period of time. The temporary church was converted into a recreation center in 1983/84 and became known as St. Mary’s Recreation Centre. In 1973, a 90-unit senior citizen’s housing complex, known as St. Mary’s Gardens, was built on the site. It is operated privately by the St. Mary’s Ukrainian Senior Citizens Housing Society.

In 2002, the Parish community celebrated the 75th anniversary of the Parish being established, the 65th anniversary of the Basilian Father’s continuous service in the Parish, and the 60th anniversary of the existence of the parish choir.

The parish has historically be the center of religious and Ukrainian community activities in the Vancouver Lower Mainland. Over the years, our community has been visited by the heads of the Ukrainian Catholic Church, including the most recent visit of the newly appointed Major Archbishop Sviatoslav Shevchuk. His Beatitude’s visit to Canada coincided with the 100 year anniversary of the appointment of Canada’s first Ukrainian Catholic Bishop the Blessed Martyr, Nykyta Budka, and the 2012 Annual Synod of the Ukrainian Catholic Bishops, held in Winnipeg.

Location
550 West 14th Avenue
Vancouver, BC V5Z 1P6
(wheelchair accessible)

Contact
Phone: 604-879-5830
Fax: 604-874-2727
Email: office@stmarysbc.com

Website
stmarysbc.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy
08:30 & 10:30

Daily Divine Liturgy
07:30 Mon-Sat

Holy Day Divine Liturgy
10:30 and 19:00

Updated
November 8, 2014

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We are a Catholic Church — in the Byzantine Tradition:

  • a friendly small neighbourhood parish
  • young families
  • children and youth
  • active & lively seniors
  • EVERYONE is welcome

Location
8700 Railway Avenue
Richmond, BC V7C 3G8

Contact
Phone: 604-447-1731
Email: byzchurch@gmail.com

Website
easternchurch.wordpress.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy
11:00 – English with textual translations in other languages

Other Services

Saturday Evening Vigil
19:00 Saturdays

Confession
after Saturday Vigil or by appointment

Updated
November 8, 2014

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Location
4017 Victoria Avenue
Nanaimo, BC  V9T 2A4

Contact
Phone: 250-384-2292
Fax: 250-754-2313

Divine Liturgy
11:00 Saturdays – Ukrainian/English

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St. Nicholas Parish
November 82014

St. Nicholas Ukrainian Catholic church is proud to be a leader in Ukrainian events in Victoria. Although most of our members have Ukrainian roots, we are also Catholic! We strive to open our doors and hearts to the Catholic community in the greater Victoria area. Come to a Sunday liturgy, and meet our parish community after for coffee, tea and uniquely Ukrainian desserts.

Location
1112 Caledonia Avenue
Victoria, BC  V8T 1G1

Contact
Phone: 250-384-2292
Email: stnicks@telus.net

Sunday Divine Liturgy
10:00 – Ukrainian/English

Daily Divine Liturgy (Monday to Thursday)
10:00 – English

Website
stnicholasparish.org

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Location:
472 Bagot Street
Kingston, Ontario, K7K 3C4

Contact:
Phone: 613-544-6682
Pastor’s Phone: 613-862-5356
Email: rrytsar@gmail.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy
10:00 – Ukrainian/English

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St. John the Baptist Parish
September 212014

From the first year of Ukrainian immigration to Canada in 1891, many Ukrainian immigrants visited Ottawa. Some of these immigrants stopped in Ottawa on their journey to Western Canada and found temporary employment. The first permanent Ukrainian residents settled in Ottawa in approximately 1905. They worked on the railway, in the lumber industry, in construction and other manual labour occupations. In 1908, these Ukrainian immigrants founded the Prosvita (education) Association, the first Ukrainian cultural association in Ottawa.

By 1914, there were over 200 Ukrainians in Ottawa. Under the leadership of Rev. J. Fylyma, founding meeting of 70 heads of families was held on October 11, 1914 to organize a Greek- Catholic (the designation for Ukrainian Catholics at that time) parish with a permanent parish priest. The new parish was called the Ruthenian (Latin term for Ukrainians) Catholic Church of St. John the Baptist. Church services were held in a rented Roman Catholic Church on Sussex Street, but in 1916 the church was destroyed by fire. Church services were then held at the Franciscan Fathers chapel on Wellington Street.

In 1918, a building was purchased on the corner of Rochester and Balsam streets and converted into a church. The new church now under the leadership of Father M. Kuzmak was consecrated by Bishop Nykyta Budka. Near the church, another building was erected for use as a Ukrainian school and as the Prosvita cultural center. Under the new leadership of Rev. Wasyl Gegeichuk, the Ukrainian Catholic Parish began to expand its activities in 1919. The cultural center was enlarged and a choir, amateur dramatic circle, mandolin orchestra and dancing club were organized. The parish cultural groups also performed outside the Ukrainian community.

In 1966 the parish moved to a new location on the corner of Carling and Irving and built a hall, which was used as a church, intending to build a church on that site at a later date. However, since that site was too small, and additional land could not be acquired, the present site on Green Valley Crescent was acquired in 1984. This site is ideally suited for the Shrine since it is bordered on the east side by the historic Rideau Canal, and on the south by a major thoroughfare: Heron Road. In 1987, the building of the church was completed and designated as a Sobor (Shrine) and a national monument to commemorate the Millennium of Christianity in Ukraine (988-1988).

The interior decoration of the church (iconography and stained glass windows) began in the fall of 1999, and was completed in December 2000. The main artist was Professor Lubomyr Medvid’ from Lviv, Ukraine. Assisting him was Stepan Yuzefiv. The windows designed by Professor Medvid’ were produced on site by Mykola Shymchuk, Orest Tarnavskyj and Ihor Tarnavskyj, all from Lviv, Ukraine.

Location:
952 Green Valley Crescent
Ottawa, Ontario, K2C 3K7

Contact:
Phone: 613-723-1673
Fax: 613-723-9879
Email: pastor-st-john-baptist-shrine@rogers.com

Website: 
st-john-baptist-shrine.ca

Schedule of Sunday Services
Saturday Night Vespers: 6:00pm in English
Sunday Divine Liturgy: 9:15 am in Ukrainian, 11:30 am in English with Ukrainian

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Holy Ghost Parish
September 212014

Location:
49 West Street
Sydney, Nova Scotia, B1N 1R9

Contact:
Phone: 902-564-5201
Email: roma.dusanowskyj@gmail.com

Website: 
capebretonukrainianchurch.ca

Sunday Divine Liturgy
9:00 am – Ukrainian/English

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Since 2001, Saint Andrew’s Ukrainian Catholic Mission of Halifax-Dartmouth has been an outreach Mission of the Holy Ghost Ukrainian Catholic Church in Sydney, Nova Scotia. Holy Ghost’s Parish priest (Father Roman Dusanowskyj), travels to Dartmouth once a month to celebrate Divine Liturgy in the Ukrainian Catholic Byzantine Rite. Generally, about 25 people attend these services – new parishioners are always welcome!

Location:
St. Anthony of Padua Church
26 Courtney Road
Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, B3A 4B8

Contact:
Phone: 902-564-5201
Email: roman.dusanowskyj@gmail.com

Website:
staucmhd.blogspot.ca

Sunday Divine Liturgy
6:00pm – last Sunday of every month

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The faded green copper domes of the Church of the Great Martyr, St. George the Victorious, rise above the skyline, serving as an impressive landmark to all travelers on the 401. Set in the heart of Old Oshawa, on Albert Street, the church has long been the spiritual home for Ukrainian Catholics living in an area stretching between Scarborough and Kingston. The parish itself was established circa 1912, with the blessing of Bishop Nikita Budka, shortly after immigrants from Galicia and Bukovinia first settled in the area. For the next 40 years, the first church, built in 1916/17, was a religious and social center for Ukrainians, as well as other ethnic groups, who lived and worked in the surrounding community.   Following World War II, Oshawa received great numbers of Ukrainian immigrants, many of whom had served as slave labourers in Germany or had otherwise been forced to leave their homeland, and had chosen to make Canada their new home. As the church became too small for the growing community, land was purchased on the other side of the street, and construction of a new church was begun in 1955, with Bishop Isidore Borecky blessing the cornerstone. In the 50 years since the completion of the new temple, the church of St. George the Great Martyr, has provided spiritual nourishment to countless Ukrainian Catholics who have been baptized, married and buried here. In recent years, the parish has welcomed a new wave of immigrants from Ukraine and Poland, as well as English-speaking newcomers, all of whom contribute in new ways to the rich mosaic, which is the history and make-up of this parish.

Over the years, the parish has developed well beyond the doors of the church. Fr. John Pereyma, who served here for 40 years, initiated not only the building of the new temple and a fine rectory, but also the establishment of St. Wolodymyr and Olga Cemetery. He also devoted his time towards a campaign to build a Catholic elementary school within the community, which resulted in the opening in 1964 of John F. Kennedy School (later renamed Monsignor John C. Pereyma Catholic School and turned into a secondary school).

In 1982, as a project to commemorate the millennium of Christianity in Ukraine, the parish built Lviv Hall on Jackson Ave (now Lviv Boulevard). The hall serves as a cultural center for the community, is a popular facility for weddings and many other events and also houses the Ukrainian Credit Union. Every year in June, during Fiesta (Oshawa’s week-long multicultural festival), the hall is a flurry of activity, welcoming thousands of visitors who come to enjoy delicious Ukrainian food and to watch spirited dance performances by the parish’s own Lviv Dancers.

Inspired by a desire to provide for the needs of the aging members of the community, the parish initiated a new project in 2001 – the establishment of St. George Seniors’ Residence on First Ave., just a block away from the church. Unfortunately this project was fraught with many serious financial difficulties and so in 2009 the building was sold. However, those who now live in the residence appreciate the blessing of living independently, close to the church and the community they have known and loved.

Many priests have served this parish since its inception almost a hundred years ago, each one contributing in his own way to the development of the parish community. From 2005 to February 2012 the parish was served by Fr. Bohdan Bilinsky and Dobrodiyka Cornelia, who were assigned here in September 2005. In 2008, the parish had the joy of witnessing the ordination of Sub-Deacon Andrija Petresin to the diaconate and subsequently to the priesthood. In the spring of 2009, the parish family was joined by Fr. Orest Ostapowich and Dobrodiyka Lidia, who assisted in the parish until February 2012. In 2012, the parish again witnessed another ordination as this time, Deacon Alexander Laschuk was ordained to the priesthood in conjunction with the 100th anniversary of the parish.

In February 2012, a new pastor was assigned to St. George Parish. Fr. Dmytro Hancharyk and Dobrodiyka Myroslava along with their two children, Stepan and Sofiya, have taken up residence in the parish rectory and are currently serving the parish.

Location:
597 Albert Street
Oshawa, Ontario, L1H 3C3

Mailing Address:
42 Lviv Boulevard
Oshawa, Ontario, L1H 3C3

Contact:
Phone: 905-725-2617
Fax: 905-725-2619
Email: stgeorgeoshawa@bellnet.ca

Website: 
stgeorgethegreatmartyr.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy
9:00 am – Ukrainian
11:00 am – Ukrainian/English

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St. Joseph’s was founded in 1956. The first Liturgy was celebrated by Fr. Gregory Shushkewych on Ukrainian Christmas (January 7, 1956) at St. Andrew’s Roman Catholic Church in downtown Oakville. In the early years this small mission parish was served by the Redemptorist Fathers from their seminary in Meadowvale. In 1964 a 1-acre parcel of land was purchased on Maple Grove Dr.
The chapel on Maple Grove Drive served the parish well since 1966. In 2008 a 4-acre parcel of land was purchased (corner of Trafalgar Rd & River Oaks Blvd). Two years later construction began on a 43,000 sq.ft. facility. which included a new church, a daycare and a modern parish centre. A small number of seniors who were founding members in the 1950s were delighted to attend the blessing of the new church in April of 2012. A chapel located off the narthex of the church has been dedicated to honour all our pioneer families.

Location:
300 River Oaks Blvd. East
Oakville, ON, L6H 5T1

Contact:
Phone: 905-337-1400
Fax: 905-337-1400
Email: admin@sjucc.ca

Website: 
sjucc.ca

Sunday Divine Liturgy
9:00 am – Ukrainian
11:00 am – Ukrainian/English

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Location:
940 The East Mall, Suite #201
Toronto, Ontario, M9B 6J7

Contact:
Phone: 416-746-0154
Fax: 416-746-6003
Email: eparchto@bellnet.ca

Website:
ucet.ca

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The beginnings of St. Josaphat’s Cathedral Parish are very tied to the settlement of the first Ukrainian immigrants in Toronto. The first Fr. Zaklynsky, who came up to Toronto from the United States, served the first Divine Liturgy in 1908. In February of 1911 a priest from Ukraine arrived in Toronto and began organizing the parish and just a year later, in February 1912, the parish began building a church under the direction of a new, young, energetic priest: Fr. Joseph Boyarchuk.

In May 1913, the parish purchased a plot of land along with a house on Franklin Avenue and later in July, Blessed Heiromartyr Nykyta Budka, then Exarch of Canada, blessed the cornerstone of the new church and on palm Sunday in 1914, the church was consecrated and the first Hierarchical Divine Liturgy was served.

Numerous church groups and organizations were formed soon after: a parish choir, an apostolic sisterhood of prayer, a parish school, a number of brotherhoods and numerous groups that focused on culture and arts. Parishioners were very generous and donated what they could which led to the installation of banners, pews, bells, two chandeliers, confessionals, icons and a pulpit. While the parish had quite some debt, each pastor worked hard to lower this debt annually.

In 1921, the Servant of God Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky visited the parish.

In 1941, the interior of the church was completed and blessed that same year by Bishop Basil Ladyka O.S.B.M.

In 1948, with the division of the Canadian Exarchate into three Ukrainian Catholic Exarchates, St. Josaphat’s became the Cathedral for the first Exarch of Eastern Canada, Bishop Isidore Borecky.

St. Josaphat’s was also the first Ukrainian Catholic Parish to have an elementary school attached to it. St. Josaphat’s Catholic Elementary School began in 1960 under the leadership of the Fr. Basil Filevich.

In 1964, the original St. Josaphat’s Cathedral burned down and a year and a half later, in December of 1965, the rebuilt Cathedral of St. Josaphat was opened and it was subsequently blessed in 1967 with a new, baroque-style iconostas. From 1967-1968, iconographer Ivan Belskyj wrote the interior iconography of the cathedral.

Patriarch Josyf Slipyj visited the Cathedral three times: in 1968, 1973 & 1976. Patriarch Myroslav Ivan Lubachivsky visited 1986 with Metropolitan Volodymyr Sterniuk.
Three former pastors of St. Josaphat’s became Bishops in the Ukrainian Catholic Church: Bishop Andrew Roborecki, Bishop Basil Filevich and Bishop Roman Danylak.

Currently, the parish has over 250 registered families with an elementary school attached and numerous church organizations: UCWLC, the Brotherhood, a prayer group called “Mothers in Prayer” and a parish choir.

In the Fall of 2014, St. Josaphat’s cathedral will celebrate its 100th anniversary and preparations are well underway.

Location:
143 Franklin Avenue
Toronto, Ontario, M6P 3Y9

Contact:
Phone: 416-535-9192
Fax: 416-535-9192
Email: saintjosaphat@rogers.com

Website:
saintjosaphat.com

Sunday Services:
Saturday Evening Vespers, 5:00 pm – Ukrainian
Sunday Divine Liturgy, 8:30 am & 10:30 am – Both in Ukrainian

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The impact of the Second World War on Ukraine and its people was great. Many people found themselves displaced, in poverty and looking for protection outside their homeland. It was shortly after WWII that the second large emigration of Ukrainians to Canada began. This influx of people led to the rapid growth of Ukrainian cultural and church institutions.

After spending years looking for land to purchase for the construction of a new church, the parishioners of what was them know as the Parish of Our Lady of Perpetual Help finally found a plot of land in the area of Bloor and Ossington.

At first, the Byzantine Catholic Slovaks intended to build a church on the same plot of land but their foundation collapsed. It was discovered that the immediate ground was very soft and hard ground was found much further down. Therefore, the architects and builders determined that the church had to be built on iron pillars that went almost 50 feet deep into the ground. By 1962, construction of the church building began and the parish was renamed to Protection of the Mother of God Ukrainian Catholic Church.

In 1964, construction was complete and the next step was the interior decoration of the church. The church was built in a Cossack Baroque style with long balconies that stretch from the choir to the iconostas. Also, there are 4 small chapels found in alcoves in the balcony. Pews were installed; yellow marble was brought in from Italy and installed along the walls so that those who leaned on the walls would not damage the walls or mark them.

Eventually, a wooden iconostas was carved and installed by artist, Mr. Barak. Iconographer Sviatoslav Hordynsky wrote the icons for the iconostas and, having been called to Rome by Patriarch Josyf Slipyj to do the interior decoration of St. Sophia’s, he was not able to finish the rest of the church. The altar area was painted by Ivan Belskyj who had painted numerous Latin Rite churches in Venezuela and having met Bishop Isidore (Borecky), the Eparch of Toronto, he was invited to come to Canada to do the iconography for St. Josaphat’s Cathedral and the altar area of our church.

Lacking funds, further icnography was postponed until 1971 when renowned iconographer Heiko Schlieper took on the task of completing the iconography inside the church. However, he too was not able to complete the iconography as at the end of his contract, he left for Edmonton to write the icons for St. George the Great Martyr Parish.

Ten years later, after collecting the necessary funds, it was decided to finally complete the iconography. A group of artists came from Ukraine, led by Oleh Valenyuk, to complete the interior iconography, which took the next two years. Before this, however, it was necessary to fix the leaks, which had were found in the domes. Having completed the outside repairs and restoring of the domes, the final phase of iconography began.

The final need for the parish was a residence next to the church. With the blessing of Kyr Stephen & the continued collection of necessary funds, the residence was built and completed in 2007.

In its almost 50 years of existence, the parish has had numerous active organizations including the Brotherhood of Ukrainian Catholics, the UCWLC, a parish choir along with another choir, “Blahovist” and for over 30 years, its own parish Credit Union. This parish has had 4 pastors in its existence and numerous priests that have diligently and faithfully served the parish.

Location:
30 Leeds Street
Toronto, Ontario, M6G 3R8

Contact:
Phone: 416-531-9949
Email: soborpokrova@gmail.com

Website:
holyprotection.ca

Sunday Divine Liturgy:
8:00 am – Ukrainian
9:30 am – Ukrainian
11:30 am – Ukrainian
7:00 pm – Ukrainian

More Information»

Location:
276 Bathurst Street
Toronto, Ontario, M5T 2S3

Contact:
Phone: 416-603-8049

Sunday Divine Liturgy:
10:00 am – Ukrainian

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Sts Peter and Paul Parish in the City of Toronto (formerly Scarborough) was founded in January 1949 by a small group of 12 local families.
The first Church building was erected in 1952. It was a modest and unobtrusive block and wood frame structure nestled among the fields of the small farming community then known as Agincourt. It was demolished in the spring of 1978 to make way for the lofty and majestic edifice which stands in its place today.
The present Church, with its modernized Kozak-Baroque style, was designed by architect Roman Dumyn and built by Perwin Construction Ltd (Toronto). The central, copper-plated dome or cupola rises 130 ft (40 m) above ground level and the Church has seating for 350 people.
In the interior, the traditional Iconostasis – the carved, wooden icon screen which separates the Sanctuary from the Nave – was put in place in 1984. The iconostasis design and icons are the work of Vladimir Denysenko. The wood carving was supervised by Juan Denysenko (Vladimir’s father and a second generation iconographer himself). The “Oranta” – the magnificent icon of the Mother of God flanked by the Archangels Michael and Gabriel – adorning the front of the Church, the main arch and the bulk of the Sanctuary iconography are also the work of Vladimir Denysenko and were completed in 1988 on the Millennium of Christianity in Rus’-Ukraine.
The remainder of the Church iconography (walls, ceiling and dome) is the work of Bohdan Holowacki, a Ukrainian-born Toronto artist and iconographer, and is the result of six years of prayerful and painstaking labour.
The oldest building on the Church property is the old Residence just across from the Church. It was built in 1956, with a later addition in 1967, and originally served as the pastor’s residence, meeting hall and parish Ukrainian School.
Today the parish boasts a spacious Community Centre and Banquet Hall adjacent to the Church. Opened in 1970, it comprises a large, air-conditioned Banquet Room for parties of 150-600 persons. The hall was renovated in 1999.

Location:
1490 Markham Road
Toronto, Ontario, M1B 2V9

Contact:
Phone: 416-239-4656
Fax: 416-239-2656
Church Hall: 416-291-7401
Email: stspeterandpaulparish@rogers.com

Website:
stspeterandpaul.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy:
9:30 am – Ukrainian
11:15 am – English

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Holy Eucharist Parish
July 152014

In the 1920’s several immigrant Ukrainian families of the Greco-Catholic Faith (Orthodox Christians in communion with Rome) settled in the east end of Toronto and began to slowly coalesce into a small community. In 1927, a Heritage School was established for their children. They met socially and congregated for worship at various locations, depending on the availability of a priest.

In 1937, with the purchase of a church building on King Street, a small but definite community of eight Ukrainian Greco-Catholic faithful was established, under the name “Sacred Heart Parish.” Beginning with the feast of Holy Pascha, the faithful gathered every Sunday at the new site to celebrate the Most Holy Eucharist.

The parish received canonical approval in 1938 by Most Rev. Kyr Ladyka, Bishop of Winnipeg. In 1948, the parish became part of the newly formed Eparchy of Toronto, under the pastoral care of the Bishop of Toronto and Eastern Canada, Kyr Isidore Borecky. The name of the parish was officially changed to “Holy Eucharist Ukrainian Catholic Church.”

Location:
515 Broadview Avenue
Toronto, Ontario, M4K 2N6

Contact:
Phone: 416-465-5836
Fax: 416-461-5852
Church Hall: 416-461-1387
Email: holyeucharist@rogers.com

Website:
hagiaeucharistia.com

Sunday Services:
Saturday Evening Vespers, 7:00 pm – Bilingual
Sunday Morning Matins, 8:30 am – Bilingual
Sunday Divine Liturgy, 9:30 am (Ukrainian) & 11:30am (English)

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Welcome to our parish! It is our desire that all people will come to know, love and serve the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, the one God in Three Persons revealed to us by our Lord Jesus Christ. We invite you to participate in our Sunday Divine Liturgy. Discover for yourself the joys and challenges found in the fullness of our Christian Faith and Life celebrated in Ukrainian (Byzantine) Catholic Tradition.

Wednesday, May 5, 1999, is a significant date for our parish family. On this date two communities were amalgamated into one worshipping church: Christ the Good Shepherd/St. Michael’s Ukrainian Catholic Church. The faithful of both parishes gathered at 7:30 p.m. to welcome their Bishop, Most Reverend Cornelius Pasichny and to celebrate the installation of Fr. Terry Lozynsky as the pastor of the combined parishes. A Moleben Service in honour of the Mother of God was celebrated and everyone gathered in the parish hall for a social. The following Sunday, May 9, a Divine Liturgy of Thanksgiving was celebrated and the new life of the parish began.

A brief history follows in order to discover our roots and to pay tribute to the people who volunteered their time and talents to the glory of God.

St. Michael’s Church

The first Divine Liturgy was celebrated in New Toronto on Easter Sunday, April 28, 1940 by Fr. P. Salyatytsky, assisted by Deacons J. Krystalovich and Walter Firman. The next year, on Easter Sunday, Fr. Andrew Roberecki, rector of St. Josaphat’s Cathedral, celebrated the Divine Liturgy at St. Teresa’s Roman Catholic Church.

Community life began to grow with the establishment of a Ukrainian Language School by the Sisters Servants of Mary Immaculate. Sr. Matthew served as director and the first classes were conducted in the home of the Mostoways.

Parish life continued on a limited basis during the years 1944-48.

With the arrival of the new Ukrainian immigrants from Europe in 1949, Bishop Isidore Borecky designated the parish as a mission station and assigned Fr. Lawryshyn the responsiblity for the welfare of this mission.

On February 24, 1952, Bishop Isidore celebrated a Divine Liturgy at St. Teresa’s Church assisted by Fr. Lipsky and Fr. Lawryshyn. During this Service Bishop encouraged the faithful to begin the construction of their own church building.

A church property was purchased for $1,500.00 and on March 22, 1954 Bishop Isidore blessed the property. Architectural plans were executed by John Pylypenko.

Immediately parishioners donated their time and labour and on September 6, 1954, the parish hall was opened. The solemn consecration of the church was celebrated on October 16, 1954 and Fr. Walter Firman was appointed the first parish priest.

Fr. Firman died suddenly on July 20, 1967 and Fr. Bohdan Ostapowych was appointed pastor on September 15.

During the following years a Ukrainian Language School was established. Parish organizations included a church choir, a branch of the Ukrainian Catholic Women’s League of Canada and Altar Servers. A beautiful iconostas was erected in the sanctuary in March, 1974. Volodymyr Barak carved the icon screen and the Sviatoslav Hordynskyj painted the icons.

Christ the Good Shepherd

On January 14, 1998, under Prot. No. 1/98 Bishop Isidore Borecky officially established a new parish community dedicated to our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ under the title of Christ the Good Shepherd.

Temporary residence for the parish was the gymnasium of St. Pius X Catholic School located in the Jane/Bloor area of Toronto.

The first organizational meeting of this parish was held on Thursday, March 12, 1998 and the first Divine Liturgy was celebrated on Sunday, March 29, 1998. Bishop Isidore celebrated the Palm Sunday Divine Liturgy with the newly established parish on Sunday, April 5.

Parish life began to flourish and new parishioners were attracted to this vibrant community whose mission statement emphasized “welcoming the new, the wandering, the poor and the isolated.”

During this entire period efforts were being made to find a permanent home for the community. With the support of a major donor negotiations were almost finalized to purchase a beautiful Anglican church and property in the High Park area of Toronto. At the last moment directions were received from the Chancery Office and in a letter dated April 15, 1999 (Prot. No. 14/99) Bishop Cornelius Pasichny requested the blending of Christ the Good Shepherd with St. Michael’s. Parishioners expressed disappointment at this request but after prayer and reflection they faithfully accepted the direction of the Bishop and began the move to Sixth Street in the Lakeshore/Islington area of Toronto.

Location:
182 Sixth Street
Toronto, Ontario, M8V 3A5

Contact
Phone: 416-251-3877
E-Mail: christthegoodshepherdparish@yahoo.ca

Website:
facebook.com/UCC6thStreet

Sunday Divine Liturgy:
9:00 am – Ukrainian
10:30 am – English

Note:
This parish is found at St. Michael the Archangel Ukrainian Catholic Church.

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Location:
2 Holmes Street
Ardeer, VIC 3022

Contact:
Phone: (03) 9363 1624
Fax: (03) 9363 1624
E-mail: mitratzenon@gmail.com

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The growth of the Ukrainian Catholic Church in Canada progressed steadily. In 1956, after the death of Archbishop B. Ladyka, Pope Pius XII established the Ukrainian Catholic Metropolitinate in Canada which was situated in Winnipeg. Bishop Maxim Hermaniuk, CSSR, who was the Auxiliary Bishop for Archbishop Ladyka, became the first Metropolitan of Canada. The existing exarchates were announced as eparchies. In 1974, during the papacy of Pope Paul VI from the western eparchy with its see in Edmonton was established another eparchy directed by Bishop Jerome Chimy, OSBM, and situated in New Westminster, while Rev. Demetrius Greschuk became the Auxiliary Bishop of Edmonton. In 1982, Bishop Andrew Roberecki of Saskatoon passed away and the administrative duties were carried out by Rev. Rudolph Luzney until Bishop Filevich investure in December, 1983. In 1982, Bishop Myron Daciuk, OSMB, became the Auxiliary Bishop of the Winnipeg Archdiocese. In 1986, Bishop Neil Savaryn passed away and his position was succeeded by Auxiliary Bishop D. Greschuk.

Location:
233 Scotia Street
Winnipeg Manitoba R2V 1V7

Contact:
Phone: 204-338-7801
Fax: 204-339-4006
Email: chancery@archeparchy.ca

Hours:
Monday-Friday, 9:00 am – 4:30 pm
Closed Fridays June-August

Website:
archeparchy.ca

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Location:
115 McGregor Street
Winnipeg, Manitoba R2W 4V5

Office & Mailing Address:
206-114 McGregor Street
Winnipeg, Manitoba R2W 5J7

Contact:
Phone: 204-589-5025
Fax: 204-589-6812

Website:
stsvladimirandolgacathedral.ca

Sunday Divine Liturgy:
09:00 am
11:00 am

Notes:
After the Basilian Fathers constructed the new, large St Nicholas church in 1904, the old, small church building, erected in the spring of 1900, was temporarily transformed into a reading hall and Ukrainian Heritage School. Soon, however, tensions began to emerge between the Basilians and some of the parishioners who had established and built the small church. The dissident parishioners were suspicious of the austere Basilian monks not only because the latter recognized the authority of Archbishop Langevin and accepted financial aid from the Roman Catholic primate, but also because the Basilians opposed everything that smacked of secularism and liberalism, including ‘evil and godless’ books, newspapers, and community organizations. What the dissidents yearned for were worldly, married

Ukrainian Catholic secular priests, like the ones they had known in the old country, and the immediate appointment of a Ukrainian Catholic bishop, who, they believed, would guarantee the autonomy and survival of their church in Canada. In September 1907, assisted by Father Mykola Strutynsky, a Ukrainian-American secular priest who was visiting Winnipeg, they established the Ss Vladimir and Olga Ukrainian Catholic parish with the old, small church, at 115 McGregor Street – soon expanded to accommodate 400 worshippers – as their place of worship. The Church building and parish property, it was resolved, would be incorporated with a parish committee and the parish would not recognize the authority of the Roman Catholic archbishop. Obtaining the services of a Ukrainian Catholic secular priest, however, proved to be very difficult at a time when 97 per cent of Ukrainian Catholic secular priests were married and married priests had been banned from North America by local primates and the Vatican. When Father Ivan Zaklynsky of Minneapolis could not be persuaded to move to Winnipeg, the parish executive brought Father Toma Vasylevych to the city in April 1908 from Terebovlia county, eastern Galicia, with funds provided by the Ukrainian Mutual Benefit Association of St Nicholas but without the permission of the Church hierarchy in Lviv or St Boniface. After Father Vasylevych’s departure some 6 months later, he was succeeded by Father Alexander Humecky (Humetsky), another itinerant priest who had come to Canada without the hierarchy’s permission. Humecky remained at his post for a year, overseeing the construction of a priest’s residence and a parish hall, before abandoning the parish and the Ukrainian Catholic Church for the Russian Orthodox Church. Only with the arrival of the elderly Father Emyliian Krasicky (Krasitsky) in 1910 did the parish acquire a degree of stability. Parish debts were paid off, a church choir was organized, and the new pastor helped and encouraged young parishioners to establish a drama circle as an alternative to beer parlours and billiard halls.

During Father Krasicky’s tenure, Ss Vladimir and Olga parish, still unreconciled with Church authorities in Lviv and St Boniface, became a focal point of agitation concerning Ukrainian Catholic rights in Canada. In August 1910, more than 2,000 Ukrainian Catholics attended a mass meeting on the parish grounds. They resolved to petition Metropolitan Andrei Sheptytsky of Lviv, who was scheduled to visit Winnipeg in October, for married priests and a Ukrainian Catholic bishop. A petition to this effect was circulated and presented to the primate, who urged patience, acknowledged that popular opposition to the incorporation of parish property with Roman Catholic episcopal corporations was legitimate, and promised that in two years there would be Ukrainian Catholic secular priests and a Ukrainian bishop in Canada. When that bishop, 35 year-old Nykyta Budka, finally took up his duties in Canada in December 1912, the parish recognized his authority and the new Bishop in turn accepted Father Krasicky and his flock into communion with the Church. Within months, Ss Vladimir and Olga was designated the Bishop’s cathedral. Some parishioners continued to demand married secular priests for at least another year, although this privilege would not be restored to Ukrainian Catholics in North America until after the Second World War.

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Location:
965 Boyd Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba R2X 0Z9

Contact:
Phone: 204-582-7535
Email: BVMChurch@gmail.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy:
09:00 am – Ukrainian
11:30 am – English

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Blessed Bishop and Martyr Vasyl Velychkovsky, C.Ss.R. was beatified in 2001 by St. Pope John Paul II. His holy relics (a fully intact body) are enshrined in St. Joseph’s Ukrainian Catholic Church in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. This is Canada’s Second Martyr’s Shrine. Since the enshrinement, this Shrine has become a source of grace and blessing for many people.

Location:
250 Jefferson Avenue
Winnipeg, manitoba R2V 0M6

Contact:
Phone: 2041-388-7321
Email: info@bvmartyrshrine.com

Website:
bvmartyrshrine.com

Shrine Hours:

Monday
Closed

Tuesday–Friday
10:00 am – 5:00 pm

Divine Liturgy is celebrated in the Shrine every Wednesday at 8:00 am
Akathist or Moleben in honour of Blessed Vasyl is celebrated every Wednesday at 7:00 pm

Saturday
10:00 am – 1:00 pm

Sunday
After Divine Liturgies

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St. Joseph Parish
May 162014

St. Joseph’s Parish was founded in 1952 by Fr. Joseph Denischuk CSsR and is one of fifteen Ukrainian Catholic Churches in Winnipeg. St. Joseph’s continues to be a young thriving byzantine parish. The Church is home to the holy relics of Bishop & Martyr Blessed Vasyl Velychkovsky.

Location:
250 Jefferson Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba R2V 0M6

Contact:
Phone: 204-339-4512
Fax: 204-338-9029

Website:
stjoeswinnipeg.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy:
08:30 am – Ukrainian
11:00 am – English

 

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St. Nicholas Parish
May 162014

Established in 1899, St. Nicholas Church became the first Ukrainian Catholic parish in Winnipeg. Since 1904, the parish has been under the direction of the Basilian Order of St. Josaphat.

Location:
737 Bannerman Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba R2X 1J9

Contact:
Phone: 204-582-6695
Fax: 204-582-1068
Email: office@stnicholaschurch.ca

Website:
stnicholaschurch.ca

Sunday Divine Liturgy:
09:00 am – Ukrainian
12:00 pm – English

Notes:
Towards the close of 1899, some 150 devoted Ukrainian Catholic immigrants worked together with Father John Damascene Polywka, OSBM, to purchase land and to build the first St. Nicholas Church at the corner of McGregor Street and Stella Avenue. Roman Catholic Archbishop Adélard Langevin extended a loan of $18,000 in 1904 for the construction of a larger church on McGregor Street opposite the first church.

The number of parishioners continued to increase steadily. By 1944, preliminary plans for a third St. Nicholas Church were initiated by Father Joseph Senkiw, OSBM. Later in 1948, after an underground auditorium was completed and in use, construction was permanently halted owing to the church’s close proximity to the Cathedral of Sts. Vladimir and Olga.

In 1961, Archbishop-Metropolitan Maxim Hermaniuk, CSsR, granted the Basilian Fathers permission to purchase land at the corner of Arlington Street and Bannerman Avenue. On the morning of July 10, 1966, Divine Liturgies were celebrated for the last time in the old church. In the afternoon, the solemn blessing of the present church took place. Later that year, the monastery-residence attached to the church was blessed. It serves as a parish office, residence for the pastor and other clergy and as headquarters for the Order of St. Basil the Great in Canada.

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St. Andrew Parish
May 162014

Location:
160 Euclid Street,
Winnipeg, Manitoba R2W 2X1

Mailing Address:
Box 4034, RPO Redwood Centre,
Winnipeg, MB R2W 3T0

Contact:
Phone: 204-943-7230
Fax: 204-943-0960

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St. Anne Parish
May 152014

We are truly humbled to have received such a multitude of blessings from Our Lord and Saviour, are very thankful to His Blessed Mother and St. Anne for their protection and guidance over the years. We can truly say, after fifty years, that “God is with us” and we can truly rejoice with all nations in singing praise to the undivided Trinity for having saved us.

Location:
35 Marcie Street
Winnipeg, Manitoba R2G 3S4

Contact:
Phone: 204-667-9588
Fax: 204-661-5454
Email: stanneucc@mts.net

Website:
stannewinnipeg.ca

Sunday Divine Liturgy:
09:00 am – Ukrainian/English
11:00 am – English

History:
Within 52 years, St. Anne Ukrainian Catholic Parish in North Kildonan, Winnipeg, has experienced immense progress. From very humble beginnings in the Fireman’s Recreation Hall on Springfield Road, where services were initiated by Father Eugene Rudachek on Easter Sunday, May 3, 1959, we have grown to be a large family oriented church that welcomes all who come to us.

On January 17, 1960, the first parish council of the new parish was elected and on March 13th the site of the future church was blessed by Archbishop Metropolitan Maxim Hermaniuk C.Ss.R. Construction of the $25,000 church began on a two acre site on Douglas Ave. and Marcie Street, one acre of which was donated by the late Paul Slusarchuk. On December 4, 1960 Metropolitan Archbishop Maxim Hermaniuk, C.Ss.R., blessed the church during the Pontifical Divine Liturgy. Members of the founding parish council included: Nick Laschuk, Tony Denchuk, Paul Polishchuk, Joseph Sobistiansky, Lawrence Popko, Tom Urbanski, Michael Kuzminski, Paul Slusarchuk, Michael Gulak, Bill Tataryn and Bill Wladyka.

The founding parish priest, Fr. Eugene Rudachek, served the parish faithfully and celebrated Divine Liturgy every Sunday. He offered Catechism classes, and personally provided transportation for the children. He also founded an Altar Boys Club and the parish U.C.W.L.C. However, in 1969 Fr. Rudachek was transferred to another parish and pastoral duties were assumed by Fr. Anthony Luhovy, who served the parish from 1969 to 1976. At the October 26, 1976, parish council meeting, chaired by Fr. Luhovy, the decision was made to divide a parcel of land belonging to St. Anne into twelve lots, the proceeds of which were to be used for the building of a new church. Thus, the faithful of St. Anne Parish began another phase of their spiritual journey for the glory of God – the construction of a new church.

With the passing of the parish priest, Fr. Anthony Luhovy in 1976, pastoral duties were assumed in the interim four month period by Fr. Peter Shwaluk. Fr. George Svoboda, a bi-ritual priest, served at St. Anne after Fr. Shwaluk. Czech by birth, Father Svoboda volunteered to help St. Anne in its time of need. He was followed by Fr. Michael Kolenich, who served the parish from 1977 until his passing in August 1987. Fr. Michael energetically and enthusiastically pursued the construction of the new and present church with the faithful parishioners. A building committee was formed, consisting of Marcel Wozny, Chairperson, and members Emile Picklyk, Ted Paley, Roman Anisimovicz, Keith Pynoo, Myron Tesluk and parish priest Fr. Michael Kolenich. The architect for the new church was Victor Deneka of Winnipeg, who had designed a number of Ukrainian Catholic churches in Manitoba.

Solemn blessing of the grounds took place on June 19, 1983. Construction of the new church began in November 1983 by AK Penner & Sons of Steinbach. The dome crosses were blessed by Most Rev. Myron Daciuk, OBSM on May 16, 1984. Pope John Paul II blessed the cornerstone during his visitation at the Ss. Vladimir and Olga Cathedral in Winnipeg, on September 16, 1984. The official opening and blessing of the present church, took placed at a Divine Liturgy celebrated by Most. Rev. Archbishop Metropolitan Maxim Hermaniuk, Fr. Kolenich and other clergy, on November 11, 1984.

Following the passing of Fr. Kolenich, Rev. Dr. Stephen Soroka assumed pastoral duties at St. Anne in September 1987. With the sudden increase growth of parishioners, and the need to accommodate new programs, the parish council, under the leadership of Stan Holyk, initiated plans to build a parish centre attaching the old church to the new church. The building committee consisted of Stan Holyk, Chairperson, and members: Garry Brodziak, Al Tymofichuk, Ernie Danyluk, John Kowalchuk, and parish priest, Fr. Stephen Soroka. Despite a large existing mortgage on the new church, the Parish Council and the parishioners pursued this Millennium project to commemorate the 1,000 years of Christianity in Ukraine (988-1988). Construction of the new Parish Centre began in October 1988 and was solemnly blessed by Archbishop Maxim Hermaniuk on October 12, 1989.

The new parish centre made it possible to offer new programs to our community. The Kildonan Seniors New Horizons was founded in February 1988. The St. Anne Lubov Nursery, founded in June 1988, offers a creative learning experience for 3 & 4 year olds within a Ukrainian Catholic environment. The St. Anne Knights of Columbus Council #10551 was founded February 21, 1991 with Marcel Wozny as the Charter Grand Knight. The St. Anne Ukrainian Dance School, founded by Natalia (Picklyk) Radawetz, has been in operation at St. Anne since 1985.

An important milestone was the purchase of the parish rectory on August 1, 1997, at a cost of $154,900.

Fr. Michael Kolenich and Fr. Walter Klimchuk were assisted by Deacon Gordon Mendres. Fr. Terrance Cherwick served St. Anne Parish, as a deacon from 1990 to 1991, prior to his ordination to the priesthood. Archeacon Stefan Tyrawski commenced his service at St. Anne Church in fall 2010 and has become fully involved in all aspects of the life of St. Anne Church. The service of the deaconate compliments and enhances the prayer services and all aspects of parish organizational life. In order to meet the requirements of serving Communion to an ever increasing number of communicants, an important ministry – the Extraordinary Ministers of the Eucharist – both men and women – was introduced in St. Anne Church in 1994, with Fr. Stephan’s guidance and the blessing of Archbishop Michael Bzdel, C.Ss.R.
Fr. Stephen Soroka quickly ascended the hierarchical ladder by becoming the Auxiliary Bishop of the Winnpeg Archeparchy in 1996 and then the Metropolitan Archbishop of Philadelphia in 2001. Rev. Canon Walter Klimchuk, who had returned home, after spending thirty years in the United States, served as pastor from September 1995 to July 2010. He celebrated his fortieth anniversary of his ordination to the priesthood on March 25, 2006.

Fr. Mark Gnutel and his lovely wife, Theresa, commenced their service at St. Anne Church in August 2010. Their love and devotion to each other and to our Lord, Jesus Christ and His church, have instilled new life and vigour to our parish spiritual and social life. Fr. Mark’s enthusiastic and energetic service and his dedication to the traditions of our Ukrainian Catholic faith have opened the doors to living our spiritual life, as Eastern Christians, more fully.

Under the dedicated leadership of our Clergy, St. Anne Church has grown to more than 450 families with over 100 children registered in catechism with director Hilary Balagus and 27 dedicated teachers and assistants instructing in the catechetical program. The Altar Servers (boys and girls) under the direction of Jarvis Yasinski and Rod Picklyk, and the Ukrainian Catholic Youth, led by Lisa Kazmerik, continue to support our youth. The St. Anne Ukrainian Dance School, which recently celebrated the 25th Anniversary of its founding, has an enrollment of 110 students with nine instructors, under the direction of Marlis Loughren. The Lubov Nursery School continues to flourish with Joylene Preun as its directress, three teaching assistants and 50 students. The Extraordinary Ministry of the Eucharist, with 29 members, continues to serve the needs of the faithful. The St. Anne U.C.W.L.C., with Elsie Marykuca as President, and a membership of 85, undertakes a number of projects including the fall supper and perogy sales, in support of the Catechism Program, church renovations and community charities. The St. Anne Knights of Columbus, with Bill Cox as Grand Knight, and a roster of 105 members, undertake a number of fundraising projects, including a Lenten Fish Fry, in support of community charities and church activities, primarily youth activities. The Kildonan Seniors New Horizons, with Stan Holyk as President, consists of 85 members who enjoy social gatherings throughout the year. The Operations-Maintenance Committee led by Rick Veale, the Liturgical Committee chaired by Leonard Mariash, and the Visiting coordinated by Mary Rebeck and Josie Bilinsky provide essential and much appreciated service to the church and community.

The St. Anne Parish Council has been an essential part of St. Anne Parish since the parish began. The parish council is responsible for the overall operation, both physical and financial, of the church, church grounds and rectory. Throughout its 50 years of service to the parish, the parish council has undergone several organizational changes in order to better meet the needs of the parish and took its current form with acceptance of the May 30, 2005 Parish Council Bylaw. The Parish Council includes an executive, elected annually, and representatives from all parish organizations and programs. The Parish Council meets monthly. Our Parish Secretary is Jane McCarvill, our Parish Financial Secretary is Christine Hur and our Parish Custodian is Cindy Korell. The various programs offered at St. Anne’s Parish are possible because of hard-working, devoted, and faithful parishioners who dedicated themselves to the instruction and betterment of others.

Weekday Liturgies, preceded by the recitation of the rosary, are held at 9:00 a.m. Three Sunday Divine Liturgies serve the spiritual needs of the parishioners: a sung English Liturgy on Saturdays at 5:00 p.m., a sung Ukrainian Liturgy on Sundays at 9:00 a.m. and a recited/sung English Liturgy on Sundays at 11:30 a.m. Kathy Bailley serves as choir director for the Saturday Liturgy. The cantor at the Ukrainian Liturgy is Emile Picklyk with Walter Zulak as conductor of the Soloveyko Parents Choir and Maryka Chabluk as conductor of the Soloveyko Children’s Choir. The Sunday English choir leader is Brian Paul.
In preparation for the golden anniversary of its founding in 2009-2010, St. Anne Parish undertook a number of major maintenance projects, including painting the church interior; reshingling the church roof in 2007; installing a new carpet in 2008 with funding provided by the St. Anne UCWLC; installing air conditioning in the church and hall in 2008; renovating the kitchen in 2009 with funding provided by the St. Anne U.C.W.L.C. and major upgrades to the rectory in 2009 and 2010.

Our 50th Anniversary celebrations commenced with a gala Children’s Concert, under the direction of Maryka Chabluk, on November 30, 2008. Our December 7, 2008 Praznik honoured our founding members with our founding priest, Very Rev. Eugene Rudachek, as our special guest. Our 2009 Easter Sunday Liturgies commemorated the 50th Anniversary of the first Divine Liturgy. A momentous occasion was the May 10, 2009 visitation of the Most Rev. Stefan Soroka to St. Anne Parish. Our 50th Anniversary Praznik, on December 6, 2009, and a Gala Banquet on February 13, 2010, concluded our celebrations.

We are truly humbled to have received such a multitude of blessings from Our Lord and Saviour, are very thankful to His Blessed Mother and St. Anne for their protection and guidance over the years. We can truly say, after fifty years, that “God is with us” and we can truly rejoice with all nations in singing praise to the undivided Trinity for having saved us.

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St. Josaphat Parish
May 152014

Location:
590 Alverstone Avenue,
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3C 2B9

Contact:
Phone: 204-775-7815
Fax: 204-772-1389

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On December 1, 1952 St. Nicholas Church took shape as a parish, under the guidance of Fr. Dr. Bohdan Lipsky, who began to form the spiritual life of the parish and the iconographic work on the interior of the church. Icons at St. Nicholas were written according to the traditions of Byzantine iconography. In addition, a small chapel dedicated to the Holy Wisdom was completed in the balcony of the church proper. Recently, the parish community centre has been renovated and updated to fulfill the needs of the parish community by providing space for the parish school, housing for priests, a small theological library and much more

The Parish has been blessed with many knowledgable and experienced Pastors: Fr. Dr. Bohdan Lipsky, Fr. Ivan Syrotynsky, Rt. Rev. Archimandrite Dmitri Pankiw, Fr. Victor Holowacz and since 2005, Fr. Dr. Roman Lobay. The parish follows the traditional liturgical life of the Byzantine Church serving matins, vespers, all-night vigils, akathists, molebens and many other services. Nowadays, the parish has 800 registered families and is served by 4 parish priests and 2 deacons.

Location:
4 Bellwoods Avenue
Toronto, Ontario, M6J 2P4

Contact:
Phone: 416-504-4774
Fax: 416-504-8428
Email: office@saintnicholas.ca

Website:
saintnicholas.ca

Schedule of Sunday Services:
Saturday Evening Vespers: 6:00 pm – Ukrainian
Sunday Morning Matins: 6:30 am – Ukrainian
Sunday Divine Liturgy: 8:00am, 9:30 am, 11:30 am, 6:00 pm – All in Ukrainian

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In 1953, Mr. And Mrs. Lev Mizun donated a parcel of land just south of Burnhamthorpe Road on the east side of Cawthra Road for the Ukrainian Catholic community to build a church. Religious services had been held in the Mizun’s home for some time, until they donated the land and the church of St. Mary’s Dormition was constructed on Cawthra Road, just south of the Cawthorpe Plaza. The first church administrator was Rev. Michael Horodysky. He was replaced by Rev. Matthew Berko in 1967.As the congregation grew, the church elders decided that a larger church should be built. The design for the new church by Architect R. Dumyn was elaborate. From its basement foundation of greenish white Ontario marble to its three storey flat roof topped by a large central dome and four smaller copper turret domes each holding a gold cross, this majestic structure is described as “a unique blend of traditional Byzantine and Ukrainian Church architecture with modern aesthetics, materials and techniques.”The church’s monumental form with glittering domes and crosses dominates the skyline, making it a landmark in the City. It was not completed until 1977. The congregation of St. Mary’s celebrated its opening with the first service being held on Sunday, December 25th.On Sunday, June 10, 2003, St. Mary’s Ukrainian Catholic Church in Mississauga, celebrated its 50th anniversary of the church’s founding with a Pontifical Liturgy and a gala affair attended my many dignitaries. At the time, the pastor of our church was our current Eparch of Toronto and Eastern Canada, Most Rev. Bishop Stephen Chmilar. Today, with Dean Rt. Reverend Roman Pankiw as Pastor, the parish numbers over 1300 families.

Location:
3625 Cawthra Road
Mississauga, ON, L5A 2Y4

Contact:
Phone: 905-279-9387
Fax: 905-279-6859
Hall: 905-277-0224
Email: office@stmaryscawthra.com

Website: 
stmaryscawthra.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy
8:00 am – Ukrainian
9:30 am – Ukrainian
11:00 am – Ukrainian

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St. Luke’s, now called St. Volodymr’s, is located at 15 Church Lane in Thornhill. The church is one of the oldest in the Archdiocese of Toronto, having been built in the mid-1840s, contemporary with St. Michael’s Cathedral in Toronto. These are the only two church buildings to remain from that period, which reflects the growing population in Toronto and York Region of Irish immigrants. St. Luke’s is a simple yet beautiful frame structure, built by Thornhill carpenter John Edey in 1847. Originally measuring only forty-eight feet long and thirty feet wide, the church was soon expanded by an additional thirty seven feet only 6 years later, to accommodate the growing parish. It became parish headquarters in 1858, with mission churches including St. Mary’s Immaculate in Richmond Hill and St. Patrick’s in Markham.

Although the exterior of St. Luke’s has not changed significantly since the 1850s, the interior has undergone a great deal of renovation over the years. Oil lamps gave way to electric ones, and parishioners no longer gather around a wood stove at the back of the church as they did in the 1800s.

In 1972, the congregation of St. Luke’s moved to a larger church on Green Lane in Thornhill. The historic building was purchased by the Ukrainian Catholics and re-named St. Volodymyr’s. A shrine commemorating the centennial of Ukrainian settlement in Canada was erected in 1991 to the south of the church itself.

St. Volodymyr parish in the suburb of Thornhill took over the unused Roman Catholic church of St. Luke along with adjoining cemetery, and began providing a home to almost 200 parishioners who had moved away from the downtown parish of St. Basil. Father Volodymyr Shewchuk began services in 1972. When a priest wasn’t living on site, the priests from the monastery next to St. Basil’s College would provide pastoral services.

Location:
15 Church Lane
Thornhill, Ontario, L3T 2G4

Contact:
Phone: 905-889-0187
Email: st.vladimirschurch@gmail.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy:
8:30 am – English
10:00 am – Ukrainian

 

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In order to write the history of Sts. Volodymyr & Olha Church at Cawaja Beach, one has to start with the first Ukrainian settlements not only at Cawaja Beach, but settlements on the Netawasaga from Wasaga Beach to Concession 18. History has it that the first active and entreprenurial settler was Ivan Bokhnevych. He worked at the “Massey Ferguson” plant. At that time the earnings were impressive, and he called many other Ukrainians to work at the plant. Consequently, they purchased lots in the Wasaga Beach area, and later built summer cottages.

Ivan Bokhnevych – a native of the Lemkivshchyna region, was also active in the Canadian Lemko organization. He invited them to the Cawaja Beach area as well. Thus the community grew and developed. In time it became a resort for holidays. Many priests visited there, among them Rev. O. Zolkewych, and Rev. I. Mykytyn. They celebrated Sunday Liturgy in the fields. Soon after discussion started about building a Ukrainian church for the Cawaja Beach community.

It started in the 1970’s when our famous businessmen Mr. M. Gerus and Mr. M. Dejnega bought up farmland at Cawaja. Mr. Gerus offered to donate land for a church as soon as a zoning change was approved. In 1985-1986 it was finally approved. Mr. Gerus subdivided the farm into lots, built roads, and donated two lots for a church. He also undertook the organization of the building committee and called B. Kramarchuk, M. Bilchak, F. Radecky and I. Malaniuk to assist him in this project. In the meantime, during summer, Sunday masses were celebrated usually by Rev. J. Lewycky and attended by about 100 persons. It was usually followed by discussions of the building project.

During one such Sunday discussion the question of Chapel versus Church had been discussed and voted on. The vote was overwhelming in favour of erecting a church. Mr. Gerus invited architect I. Stecura to propose a Hutsul-style wooden church.

The next step was getting a fundraising campaign into gear! In the meantime Mr. Gerus approached “Four Seasons” a prefab company, and ordered material for the church. The cost, excluding the roof was estimated to cost $75,000. The foundation and septic tank was contracted out at a cost of $36,000. The Church dome was contracted out to T. Haras from St. Catherines, and the electrical work was to be done by S. Holyk. The assembly of the prefabricated church building would be done by all the residents.

Fundraising started out very slowly. When it was time to pay “Four Seasons” Mr. Gerus extended a loan of $90,000. However, as work progressed enthusiasm and excitement grew with it. The treasurer, accompanied by either Mr. Gerus or Mr. Bokhnevych went from cottage to cottage to collect funds. Sadly, the people who could have made significant con-tributions were less cooperative with the exception of Mr. Hrabovsky who donated $2,000.

The community construction force was headed by Mr. Fred Radecky and assisted by I. Rozylo, J. Wojtowych, J. Malanink, I. Bokhnevych, M. Bilchak, D. Smochylo, F. Halushka, M. Maryn, M. Tarapacky, M. Vitiuk, V. Butkevych, V. Kalenij, M. Zholkevych, I. Burda, F. Kopestynsky, M. Vatral, V. Kalynin, R. Dankevych, M. Gerus and others. Mr. M. Karpynec completed the plumbing and P. Ohorodnyk offered to build the tabernacle. I apologize if I inadvertedly overlooked someone. In general, cooperation and dedication of the community was impressive. Our goal was to com-plete the roof and erect the dome before winter stepped in.

With a little additional help our goal was achieved – our church was ready by winter!

In the spring of 1989 we started work on the interior of the church. It proceeded quickly, and in July of that year Bishop I. Borecky with many priests concelebrating, officially blessed our church Sts. Volodymyr & Olha at Cawaja Beach.

Celebrations continued with an elaborate banquet in Midland. Among the guests were the “Zoloti Kluchi” (“Gold Keys”) from Ukraine with the famous Nina Matvienko and her husband in attendance.

Location:
5 Brook Avenue
Tiny, Ontario, L0L 2L0

Contact:
Phone: 705-526-1555
Email: info@cawajachurch.com

Website:
cawajachurch.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy:
2nd Sunday of each month: 9:00am
All remaining Sundays: 11:30am

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Location:
19 Parkside Drive
Barrie, Ontario, L4N 1W7

Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 327
Barrie, Ontario, L4M 4T5

Conact:
Phone: 705-730-7999
Email: lyubomyr_lev@mail.ru

Sunday Divine Liturgy:
9:00 am – Ukrainian/English

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In 1997, Vladyka Kyr Isidore (Borecky, reposed 23 July 2003), first bishop of the Ukrainian Catholic Eparchy of Toronto and Eastern Canada, sent Monsignor Conrad Dachuck, at that time pastor of St. Michael the Archangel Ukrainian Catholic Church in the Niagara region of Ontario, Canada, on a fact-finding mission to the town of Bradford, about an hour north of Toronto, to report on the feasibility of establishing a new parish there. The town of Bradford was a consideration because from 1969 to the late 1980’s a priest from St. Josaphat Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral in Toronto used to serve Liturgy there at least monthly. Father Conrad advised that any eventual parish should be located in the much larger nearby town of Newmarket, in view of the fact that Bradford, a rural town, no longer had a viable Ukrainian community, and because Newmarket,a very rapidly growing suburban center closer to Toronto, already had several families of Ukrainian background.

On 18 October 1999 the second bishop of the Eparchy of Toronto, Vladyka Kyr Cornelius (Pasichny, OSBM) assigned Father Conrad to the task of organizing a parish in Newmarket to be dedicated to the heavenly patronage of St. Catherine of Alexandria. Father visited families, obtained the use of a local Catholic school for divine service, and place announcements in the media and in the bulletins of local Latin-rite parishes. He served the first Divine Liturgy in Newmarket on Christmas day, 25 December 1999. The new community was canonically erected as a parish as of the stroke of midnight, 1 January 2000. And so St. Catherine’s, Newmarket, became the first Catholic parish to be established in Canada in the new millenium! Two months later Father Conrad was able to purchase the house which now serves as the parish rectory, weekday chapel and office.

In the spring of 2001, St. Catherine’s Building Fund was opened as a fund separate from the parish’s operating fund, and on Sunday, 24 June 2001, parishioners organized our first major fundraising event, a dinner in Newmarket. Now an annual affair, our fourth and largest fundraising dinner to date was held in the parish on Sunday, 14 March 2004. The present bishop of the Eparchy of Toronto, Vladyka Kyr Stephen (Chmilar), took the occasion to make his first episcopal visitation to Newmarket and in his homoly inspired us in our efforts for the growth of the parish.

St. Catherine’s is still in its infancy. We number about 50 families and have had three christenings and one marriage. Two of our founding parishioners have gone to the Lord. With God’s help we hope to gather many more faithful, to pass on to our children the precious heritage of Faith no nobly exemplified by the 27 Ukrainian martyrs and confessors beatified by Pope John Paul II during his trip to Ukraine in June 2001.


Location:
56 Hearn Street
Bond Head, Ontario, L0G 1B0

Mailing Address:
16 Hearn Street, Bond Head, Ontario, L0G 1B0

Contact:
Phone: 905-775-8282
Email: info@stcatherineofalexandria.ca

Website:
stcatherineofalexandria.ca

Sunday Divine Liturgy:
9:30am (Ukrainian)
11:30am (English)

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In rural Brampton, just on the outskirts of Toronto, built in 1995, the parish church of St. Elias the Prophet rises high on the Peel Plain above the Credit River Valley. Though this building was built in 1995, the parish community was started in 1976.

A wooden structure of heavy timbers (Douglas Fir), it is sheathed in Western red cedar. It has been constructed according to an architectural style known as “Boyko”, derived from western Ukraine.

Unfortunately, the church building burnt down in April of 2014. The Church is currently being rebuilt. For updates on where the parish is having its services, please consult the parish website.

Location:
10193 Heritage Road
Brampton, Ontario, L7A 0A1

Contact:
Phone: 905-459-8888
Email: pastor@saintelias.com

Website:
saintelias.com

Schedule of Sunday Services
Saturday Evening: Vespers, 7:00 pm – mostly English
Sunday Morning: Matins, 8:00am – mostly English & Divine Liturgy, 10:00am – English/Ukrainian

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In May of 1959, Fr. John Tataryn was asked to begin a new parish to serve Etobicoke residents, and to fulfill the needs of a changing community. Although many parishes flourished throughout the Toronto area, St. Demetrius the Great Martyr Parish was established to minister to a community marked by its diversity. The mandate was to welcome all and especially to meet the spiritual needs of those who through inter-marriage or linguistic concerns felt unwelcome elsewhere.

The parishioners of St. Demetrius, with the vision of Father John have built a foundation, which continues to provide a strong community for worship, education, nurturing of our cultural heritage. In 1975, a school was built to educate our children about their Ukrainian heritage. Then, as the vision of the wise pastor was becoming reality, better works were in store. He saw a great future where all Ukrainians could live together as a family. Thus, in 1984, on the occasion of the upcoming Millennium of Christianity in Ukraine, in thanksgiving to the Lord, the St. Demetrius Residence for seniors was built. This Seniors residence let people live independently while allowing them to receive care if they needed it. To further educate our children about their Ukrainian heritage, a new school was built, making it one of only four heritage schools in the GTA. With the Ukrainian Canadian Care Centre nursing home for the elderly constructed in 1994, the St. Demetrius community has witnessed further evidence of our continuing commitment to our parishioners and to the Ukrainian community.

Location:
135 LaRose Avenue
Toronto, Ontario, M9P 1A6

Contact
Phone: 416-244-5333
Fax: 416-249-5204
E-Mail: st.demetrius@sympatico.ca

Website:
stdemetrius.org

Sunday Divine Liturgy:

8:30 am – Ukrainian
10:00 am – English
11:30 am – Ukrainian

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Holy Eucharist Parish
July 152013

Four months after an initial meeting in the house of Andrew Smaha, on August 11, 1918 Frs. Peter Oleksiw and Nicholas Shumsky called an organizational meeting to form a Ukrainian Catholic parish in East Kildonan. Acting on the advice of Bishop Nykyta Budka, property at the corner of Watt Street and Montrose (now Larsen) Avenue was purchased for $1200. By July 1919, a small church (100′x25′) was completed. Holy Eucharist Ukrainian Catholic Parish, the third Ukrainian Catholic church in Winnipeg, was blessed by Bishop Nykta on October 29, 1919. The first parish priest was Fr. Michael Pelech.

By the late 1940s, with the continued growth in the East Kildonan area, the church became inadequate to the needs of the growing congregation. A campaign was begun for a new church. Under the direction of the Fr. Ihor Shpytkovsky, a triangular parcel of land was purchased at Watt Street and Munroe Avenue, just a six blocks north of the first church building. The new church, designed by the the famous Belgian priest, Fr. Philip Ruh, OMI, was built in 1954.

Location:
505 Watt Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba

Mailing Address:
489 Winterton Avenue,
Winnipeg, MB R2K 1K5

Contact:
Phone: 204-667-8866
Fax: 204-668-2024
Email: heparish@gmail.com

Website:
holyeucharist.info

Sunday Divine Liturgy:
09:00 am – Ukrainian with English Scriptures and Homily
11:00 am – English

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Location:
202 Harcourt Avenue,
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3J 3H3

Contact:
Phone: 204-837-4180
Fax: 204-896-8734

Website:
www.saintbasilwpg.ca

Sunday Divine Liturgy
10:00 am – English/Ukrainian

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Located in the heart of Historic St. Boniface, Sts. Peter and Paul Parish offers service in Ukrainian and English. It has served residents of St. Boniface since 1948 and continues to offer spiritual, cultural and educational opportunities to its membership. It is open to all nationalities wanting to worship in the Eastern Rite. As a charitable organization the parish supports most community groups requiring financial and social assistance.

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St. Michael Parish
July 142013

Located at 400 Day Street in Winnipeg, Ukrainian Catholic Parish of St. Michael the Archangel was established in 1916. At the beginning of the 20th century, the Ukrainian pioneers in Transcona depended on the church to meet their religious, cultural, traditional and educational needs. Under the leadership of Bishop Nykyta Budka, in 1913 Fr. Joseph Bala organized a parish for the Ukrainians in Transcona dedicated to St. Nicholas. As a temporary solution, the community celebrated liturgies at the Assumption Church on Leola Street. In 1916 the Parish Committee purchased three lots of land on Wabash Street at Harold Avenue on which St. Nicholas Church was built. In 1917 this church was re-dedicated to St. Michael the Archangel in order to avoid confusion with St. Nicholas Ukrainian Catholic Church on McGregor Street in Winnipeg. The first Divine Liturgy celebrated in the newly dedicated church to St. Michael was Fr. Zalitach.

The first interior decoration of St. Michael’s church was done in 1929 by William Kostur. Most Rev. Bishop Basil Ladyka, OSBM officially visited the parish that same year for the first time. Regrettably, in 1941 the interior of the church was damaged by fire. Hence, the interior was completely redecorated in 1942 by Stephen Meush.

St. Michael’s Parish faced many difficulties in its early years due to shortage of priests and lack of transportation. Arrangements for priests had to be made so that they could provide sacramental and spiritual services for the faithful. Surrounded by fields, the little white St. Michael’s church was a beautiful sight in the north-east end of Transcona.

Currently, the pastoral team tending to the parishioners at St. Michael’s consists of Rev. Dr. Gregory Zubacz and Fr. Dcn. Victor Humniski.

Location:
400 Day Street,
Winnipeg, Manitoba R2C 1B2

Mailing Address:
100 Yale Avenue,
Winnipeg, Manitoba R2C 0H8

Conatct:
Phone: 204-222-4283
Fax: 204-222-5332

Website:
stmichaelsparish.wordpress.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy:
9:30 am – English/Ukrainian

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Holy Family Parish
July 32013

Holy Family Ukrainian Catholic Church was established in 1934, providing a place of worship in south Winnipeg for Ukrainian (Byzantine rite) Catholics. Since then, the parish family has grown to over 240 families, old and young.

We are a close family and a vibrant community with many family and children’s ministries, an active youth ministry, a seniors club, the Queen of Peace prayer group, 3 choirs, pastoral care and organizations such as the Knights of Columbus and the UCWLC (Ukrainian Catholic Women’s League of Canada). We hold monthly perogy suppers from fall through spring, along with many special events throughout the year. Our spiritual life includes the celebration of Divine Liturgies on Sundays and throughout the week, along with moleben, akafist and special feast observances. Everyone is welcome to come and check us out, be it for a liturgy, a perogy supper, or just to meet new friends.

Location:
1001 Grant Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba  R3M 1Y3

Contact:
Phone: 204-453-4653
Fax: 204-475-0928
Hall: 204-452-2332

Website:
holyfamilychurch.wordpress.com

Sunday Divine Liturgy:
09:00 am – English
11:00 am – Ukrainian

Office Contacts:
Fr. Darren Kawiuk (Parish Priest) – dkawiuk@yahoo.ca
Rev. Fr. Eugene Rudachek (Sunday Confessor)
Joe Kulyk (Office Manager) – holyfamilyparishoffice@gmail.com

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The Ukrainian Catholic community in south-west Winnipeg.

Location:
31 Riel Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba R2M 2M2

Contact:
Phone: 204-256-7534
Fax: 204-224-5149

Sunday Divine Liturgy:
Unknown

in care of:
Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary (St. Norbert)

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We are the local Ukrainian Greek Catholic Parish for the city of Grande Prairie, and are part of the Peace Country pastoral district. Our mission is to preach, celebrate and live out the Gospel values, that were taught by our Lord Jesus Christ, for the sake of the building up of the Kingdom and for the salvation of all people.

Our Christian heritage comes from the East as we belong to the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church (UGCC) and follow the Byzantine Rite. Our Church is part of the Catholic Communion of Churches, of which there are 23 Particular Churches. Each Church, even though it may practice one of five rites (Byzantine, Latin, Armenian, Syrian and Coptic), shares in a common ancient Christian faith, lives out a Christian Sacramental life, and is united under the leadership of the Pope of Rome.

Each rite within the Catholic Church has its own distinct Tradition, which is made up of the following elements: Liturgy, Spirituality, Theology, Canon Law, and Sacred Art. It is important to note that each rite expresses, and celebrates, the Christian faith differently, but they all agree on the fundamental Catholic Doctrines of faith.

Our parish follows the Byzantine Rite, this rite has its origin from the apostolic church in Greece and Asia Minor, which has been gifted to the people of Kieven-Rus and now has been brought from Europe to be shared with the people of Canada.

As Byzantine Catholics we proudly maintain our Orthodox liturgical, spiritual and sacramental way of life. We invite all people who wish to deepen their faith and participate in Eastern-Christian worship to join us. Our doors are open to everyone.

Parish Address:

10901 – 102 Street,

Grande Prairie, Alberta

Services:
Sunday – Divine Liturgy: 10:00am
Saturday – Great Vespers: 4:30pm; Divine Liturgy: 6:00pm (ENGLISH)

The Sacrament of Reconciliation is scheduled after all vesper services or by request.
Baptisms and Weddings are scheduled by request.
Visitation of the sick, blessing of homes and memorial services are scheduled by request.

Fr. Roman:
Phone: (780) 933-4468
Email: fatherrp [at] gmail [dot] com

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Holy Spirit Seminary

Holy Spirit Seminary

Holy Spirit Ukrainian Catholic Seminary

January 12013

Holy Spirit Seminary is the Major Seminary of the Ukrainian Catholic Church in Canada. Its primary purpose is the preparation of candidates for ordination to the priesthood in the Catholic Church. This preparation for eparchial ministerial leadership embraces and promotes spiritual formation, theological education and practical field training. The seminary is located in Canada’s capital city of Ottawa. We welcome you to our site and invite you to learn more about us.

1030 Baseline Road Ottawa, Ontario K2C 0A6
613-727-1255
holyspiritseminary.org

 

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Saint Mary Protectress Ukrainian Catholic Church

Saint Mary Protectress Ukrainian Catholic Church

Saint Mary Protectress Ukrainian Catholic Church

January 12013

The Ukrainian Community of Orlando and Central Florida rooted in rich tradition and spiritual heritage of St. Mary Protectress Ukrainian Catholic Church acknowledges the commandment to “Go therefore, and baptize all nations” recognizing that God is the Father of all of us. Visit our parish during your stay in Orlando, Florida.

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  • Archeparchy of Winnipeg

    Archeparchy of Winnipeg

    Ukrainian Catholic Institution

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  • Sts. Vladimir and Olga Cathedral

    Sts. Vladimir and Olga Cathedral

    Ukrainian Catholic Parish

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  • Blessed Virgin Mary Parish

    Blessed Virgin Mary Parish

    Ukrainian Catholic Parish

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  • Bishop Velychkovsky Martyr’s Shrine

    Bishop Velychkovsky Martyr’s Shrine

    Ukrainian Catholic Institution

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  • St. Joseph Parish

    St. Joseph Parish

    Ukrainian Catholic Parish

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  • St. Nicholas Parish

    St. Nicholas Parish

    Ukrainian Catholic Parish

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  • St. Andrew Parish

    St. Andrew Parish

    Ukrainian Catholic Institution

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  • St. Anne Parish

    St. Anne Parish

    Ukrainian Catholic Institution

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  • St. Josaphat Parish

    St. Josaphat Parish

    Ukrainian Catholic Institution

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  • St. Nicholas the Wonderworker Parish

    St. Nicholas the Wonderworker Parish

    Ukrainian Catholic Parish

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  • Dormition of the Mother of God Parish

    Dormition of the Mother of God Parish

    Ukrainian Catholic Parish

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  • St. Volodymyr the Great Parish

    St. Volodymyr the Great Parish

    Ukrainian Catholic Parish

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  • Sts. Volodymyr and Olha Parish

    Sts. Volodymyr and Olha Parish

    Ukrainian Catholic Parish

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  • Exaltation of the Holy Cross Parish

    Exaltation of the Holy Cross Parish

    Ukrainian Catholic Parish

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  • St. Catherine of Alexandria Parish

    St. Catherine of Alexandria Parish

    Ukrainian Catholic Parish

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  • St. Elias the Prophet Parish

    St. Elias the Prophet Parish

    Ukrainian Catholic Parish

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  • St. Demetrius the Great Martyr Parish

    St. Demetrius the Great Martyr Parish

    Ukrainian Catholic Parish

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  • Holy Eucharist Parish

    Holy Eucharist Parish

    Ukrainian Catholic Parish

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  • St. Basil the Great Parish

    St. Basil the Great Parish

    Ukrainian Catholic Parish

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  • Sts. Peter and Paul Parish

    Sts. Peter and Paul Parish

    Ukrainian Catholic Parish

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  • St. Michael Parish

    St. Michael Parish

    Ukrainian Catholic Parish

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  • Holy Family Parish

    Holy Family Parish

    Ukrainian Catholic Parish

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  • St. John the Apostle

    St. John the Apostle

    Ukrainian Catholic Parish

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  • Assumption (Dormition) Parish

    Assumption (Dormition) Parish

    Ukrainian Catholic Parish

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  • Holy Spirit Seminary

    Holy Spirit Seminary

    Ukrainian Catholic Institution

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  • Saint Mary Protectress Ukrainian Catholic Church

    Saint Mary Protectress Ukrainian Catholic Church

    Ukrainian Catholic Parish

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